This presentation features Chicago Elevated train scenes, and includes 8mm film and a slideshow. The Evanston Line (with poles) and the Skokie Swift (with overhead) are covered, along with scenes in the Loop, the dedication of the Kennedy Rapid Transit, the North-South Line, and and other areas.

Comments

    • sabrina brown
      sabrina brown

      I remember riding the green and white cars back in the early 1970’s as a child, my great Aunt lived on 51st and Calumet and we would catch the train over by 51st on Garfield. Also the trains back then didn’t have air conditioner, you had to open the window.

      about 22 days ago
    • tassiebaz
      tassiebaz In reply to sabrina brown

      Hi Sabrina, Thanks for watching and for your comment. I hope the presentation brought back some good memories or you. Regards, tassiebaz.

      about 21 day ago
    • dj197475
      dj197475

      Many of the scenes here show the L using the former Chicago, North Shore and Milwaukee interurban trackage, especially the Skokie Swift.

      about 2 months ago
    • tassiebaz
      tassiebaz In reply to dj197475

      Hi dj197475, Thanks for watching and for that interesting bit of information you provided. Unfortunately the North Shore had already stopped running when I was in Chicago. I did get to see, ride, and photograph the Electroliners in Philadelphia, which are in a separate presentation of mine: "Norristown High Speed Line-The P&W" at https://youtu.be/jk1PVTYbDmY

      Regards, tassiebaz.

      about 2 months ago
    • Linda Rico
      Linda Rico

      HEY WHERES THE PINK LINE THE BEST LINE

      about 5 months ago
    • tassiebaz
      tassiebaz In reply to Linda Rico

      Hi Linda, Thanks for watching and for your comment. This presentation is from the 1960s and 1970s. The Pink Line did not start operating until 2006. Regards, tassiebaz.

      about 5 months ago
    • Taurus- Astrobike
      Taurus- Astrobike

      Awesome video AS 🇺🇸 Usual 👍👍Thankyou SO much FOR Sharing ✌

      about 6 months ago
    • tassiebaz
      tassiebaz In reply to Taurus- Astrobike

      Hi Taurus-Astrobike, Thanks for watching and for taking the time to comment. I'm glad you enjoyed the presentation. When the photography was done almost 50 years ago, I never imagined I'd be sharing the results like this, but I am glad that I am able to.
      Regards, tassiebaz

      about 6 months ago
    • Sekai Daniels
      Sekai Daniels

      Man its a trip getting old still remember, those green and white trains.

      about 7 months ago
    • Michael S
      Michael S In reply to Sekai Daniels

      The green limousine

      about 10 days ago
    • fnihp30
      fnihp30 In reply to Sekai Daniels

      Sekai Daniels I’m 40 years old and I definitely remember the green and white trains.

      about 7 months ago
    • BADGUY 1
      BADGUY 1

      I remember taking the "old" (1900's looking) CTA cars in 1963. They usually put them on the line during rush hour to supplement the newer cars. I remember the old doors that reminded me of doors on a "cattle car".

      about 10 months ago
    • RetiredGuy Adventures
      RetiredGuy Adventures

      I used to ride the "L" back in 69/70 when I was stationed at Great Lakes Naval Training Center. Sailors were so broke back then riding the "L" was cheap and fun. If you saw a neighborhood that looked interesting you could just jump off and explorer then get back on.

      about 1 year ago
    • Sekai Daniels
      Sekai Daniels In reply to RetiredGuy Adventures

      RetiredGuy Adventures man injoyed the brown line blue and redline to deff.

      about 7 months ago
    • parkman35
      parkman35

      I remember many years ago riding on the Evanston Express and it stopping a few miles north of Howard St so the motorman could put up the trolley as it left third rail power...

      about 1 year ago
    • fnihp30
      fnihp30 In reply to parkman35

      parkman35 That sounds like a real inconvenience.

      about 7 months ago
    • Sekai Daniels
      Sekai Daniels In reply to parkman35

      parkman35 man the 2005 baby's don't know what they missed.

      about 7 months ago
    • tassiebaz
      tassiebaz In reply to parkman35

      Hi parkman35, That was many years ago!!. The use of overhead wires on the line was discontinued in 1973. Regards, tassiebaz.

      about 1 year ago
    • phoebecatgirl
      phoebecatgirl

      Thanks for providing this - I rode from Linden (Wilmette) to downtown many, many times, both for school and shopping/museum visiting. Many good trips, and friendly Leo at the Wilmette stop - though disliked by a lot of adolescents, he was a very kind fellow!

      about 1 year ago
    • tassiebaz
      tassiebaz In reply to phoebecatgirl

      Hi phoebecatgirl, Thanks for watching and for your comment. I'm glad you enjoyed the presentation. Regards, tassiebaz.

      about 1 year ago
    • Robbi496
      Robbi496

      the 4000's and 6000's were built like tanks and lasted for what seemed like forever?

      about 1 year ago
    • DWCSM
      DWCSM In reply to Robbi496

      They lasted 40 - 50 years. Top quality manufacturing!

      about 10 months ago
    • MICHAEL GLASS
      MICHAEL GLASS

      Loooooooove your video.

      about 1 year ago
    • tassiebaz
      tassiebaz In reply to MICHAEL GLASS

      Hi Michel, Thanks for your kind words. I'm glad you enjoyed the presentation. Regards, tassiebaz

      about 1 year ago
    • Alexander Challis
      Alexander Challis

      Chicago Elevated Railroad (Steam) 1894:

      https://archive.org/stream/locomotiveengine07hill#page/84/mode/2up

      about 1 year ago
    • DOLRED
      DOLRED

      13:33 appears to be the old Logan Square Terminal where the Northwest Line ended at Logan Square and Kedzie Ave. By 1970, the line was extended to Jefferson Park, which required demolition of the terminal, etc.. The line ends at O'Hare now.

      about 1 year ago
    • BADGUY 1
      BADGUY 1 In reply to DOLRED

      I remember having to take a CTA bus from the North side...down Milwaukee avenue to that station (1963-1964). COLD as hell in the Winter!

      about 10 months ago
    • tassiebaz
      tassiebaz In reply to DOLRED

      Hi Dolred, Thanks for your comment. You are correct, it was the old Logan Square Terminal. Regards, tassiebaz.

      about 1 year ago
    • Ed Price
      Ed Price

      Interesting; I never saw one of those cream & green cars running as a single car; I thought that a train was always made up of multiple pairs of those cars (an A & B that never uncoupled). I recall riding in older, reddish wooden cars that seemed to be reserved for use only on the Stockyards line (which started and stopped at the current Indiana station and made a big loop through the Union Stockyards. Sometimes on a hot summer day, I would get on the El at Englewood, ride to Howard, then come back to the Loop, use a tunnel to transfer to the West Side line, and ride out to Forest Park. It was a poor-man's breezy ride, and in the 60's, IIRC, it only cost a quarter.

      about 1 year ago
    • 246spyder
      246spyder In reply to Ed Price

      The Stockyard line was an off-shoot of the "L" and when it was in use it was still running the old 4000 series "baldies" "L" cars. I'm not sure when the line was discontinued. I lived (in the '60s) at 38th and Wood and we went to the old Stockyards Amphitheater to see the Chicago Auto Show each year.

      Not many people were aware of that tunnel. Did you realize that tunnel had an entrance in the basement floor (lower lever the called it) in Marshal Fields and elsewhere, a great way to stay out of the rain and cold, and was safe. They had rebuilt it some time ago.

      about 1 year ago
    • 246spyder
      246spyder In reply to Ed Price

      Your dark trolly was, more than likely one of the Red Rockets, the Green and Creem would have been a Green Hornet actually a PCC car that the government commisioned back in the thirties to modernize the trolly lines around the country.
      As an aside the Red streetcar and the dark Maroon "L" cars are leftovers from when the CTA took over the original CSL (Chicago Surface Lines).

      Chicago's PCC's were unique in the country due to the fact that they were asymmetrical I.E. left and right handed so to speak. This was due to the proximity of the tracks to each other. A little too close.

      When you see the green and cream "L" cars they look like the PCCs' due the CTA's desire to use as many of the Hornet's parts rather than totally scrap them in order to save money on the new "L" cars.

      Also, notice that Chicago used three-door enter/exit. Enter and pay at rear and exit at center and front they also had a conductor. Most PCCs elsewhere in the country were two-door, enter and pay at front and exit at center.

      As stated the trolleybuses were mostly on the north side, to the best of my memory.

      I can now safely say that I was one of the reasons that the motormen on the Harrison St. route had to stop and re-adjust pick-up pole, for shame but fun, and boy were they mad.

      about 1 year ago
    • danbeau
      danbeau In reply to Ed Price

      Grew up on the south side, 99th and Halsted, and rode the trolley many times. It was early fifties and I was only 5 or so, but I remember them. I don't remember how far south on Halsted the trolley ran but I remember the big terminal at 79th. We would ride the trolley to 63rd and go to Sears at 63rd and Halsted. I remember the trolley coming off and the driver would have to get out and reconnect it. Also, they were cold in the winter. Trolleys were energy efficient, quiet, and non-polluting and I believe easy to maintain. They were, however not a good blend for the increasing car traffic. When I grew up in the 50s, it was not unusual for a family not to have a car. That all changed and less and less people relied on public transit. As of now, there is a movement to bring back trolleys in some major cities, good idea. And yes, as a south sider, anything north of 55th to us was another country.

      about 1 year ago
    • tassiebaz
      tassiebaz In reply to Ed Price

      Hi Ed, Your thinking is correct. Chicago had a large trolleybus (electric buses) network, where a rubber-tired bus was fitted with two poles to allow power pickup. Most of these routes operated north of the Loop on east-west streets, but a few ran north-south on streets such as Cicero, Pulaski, and Central. These were all converted to diesel by 1973. Regards, tassiebaz.

      about 1 year ago
    • Ed Price
      Ed Price In reply to Ed Price

      tassiebaz: Yes, I did get to ride the surface trolleys, both the green & cream ones and every so often, there would be an older, dark colored one. In my experiences, the #49 Route, that extra long Berwyn Avenue to 79th Street route, might have been the last trolleys with street rails and a pole pickup system (and I think the last I saw of those trolleys might have been 1963; I know that the Western service was diesel bus in June of 1964 when I did my last visit to Riverview). The interchange station at 79th & Western had a mix of electric trolleys and diesel buses, as the CTA must have been phasing in the buses route by route.

      There must be some hardware that I'm forgetting (or my mind is playing tricks on me), because I seem to recall seeing electric buses that had a pole pickup but ran on rubber tires (no tracks). That meant those buses would have had to have two wires overhead for a full circuit.

      The last time I rode the CTA was over the summer of 1968, when I was doing a daily commute from 79th & Kedzie to the Green Line at Racine, then to the Kimball Station of the Brown Line, and then north to Kimball & Peterson. I made enough money to buy a car and move to California, but, funny thing, my last job was with Cubic, which makes the revenue control equipment (turnstiles, ticket vending machines, routemap displays, ticket validators, credit software) for most of the World's rapid transit systems (BART, PATH, Atlanta, Sydney, DC Metro, Singapore, Chicago).

      about 1 year ago
    • Chiboy40
      Chiboy40

      AHHH!! The good old days!! Things were sooo much better back then.

      about 1 year ago
    • Michael Brinkers
      Michael Brinkers In reply to Chiboy40

      I grew up in Chicago during 1960-70s and rode the L (mostly Red & Brown line) regularly for school and work. I moved away in 1978, but recently returned to stay with my sister in 2014, and tried riding the L after a 36-year absence. WHAT A SHOCK. The service was terrible. Though the stations and traincars were "modernized", the ride was awful" Slowdowns and delays between every stop (Red line between Wilson and Fullerton; Brown Line between Addison and Mdse Mart). What was once a fast, uninterrupted 20-30minute ride, now took 45-60 minutes....and, this was almost every day!! What a deterioration.

      about 11 months ago
    • tassiebaz
      tassiebaz In reply to Chiboy40

      Hi Danny B, Agreed 100%!!! Regards, tassiebaz.

      about 1 year ago
    • Hollo4ever
      Hollo4ever

      thanks for this check me out and sub

      about 1 year ago
    • Quentin Kirk
      Quentin Kirk

      So Even When The Train's Weren't Ground Level(Skokie/Evanston) They Still Used Electricity From Power lines?

      about 1 year ago
    • Bill Burns
      Bill Burns In reply to Quentin Kirk

      Streetcars last ran in Chicago in June of 1958.

      about 1 year ago
    • Quentin Kirk
      Quentin Kirk In reply to Quentin Kirk

      Ed Price A Woman Working Overnight on The CTA's Addison Blue Line Stop Was Electrocuted and Killed Last Year When She Came in Contact with the Third Rail, I Pass That Stop Every Night when I'm on My Way To Work, Poor Lady She Was Thirty Six Years Old.

      about 1 year ago
    • Ed Price
      Ed Price In reply to Quentin Kirk

      Chicago used to have an extensive surface electric train system, using "streetcars" that were powered from a single overhead high voltage line (with the circuit being made to ground through the cars wheels and then the rails. Motormen sometimes had to stop, get out and use a spring-tensioned rope and an insulated pole to put the pickup roller back in place should it have popped off, or if they were making a detour around a street obstruction. This system required an extensive, ugly spiderweb of overhead conductors and support cables, but it was a safe way to get power to the streetcars. I think Chicago eliminated the last electric streetcars by about 1962, replacing them with diesel buses. The current EL system uses a "3rd rail" mounted on insulators parallel to one mechanical rail, and energized with moderately high voltage DC power (IIRC, about 600 VDC). The combination of voltage and available current makes human contact with this rail extremely, sometimes explosively, lethal. This 3rd rail must run the entire length of the service, with only very short breaks where a line crosses a surface street, a cross-over or a switch. A car has two pickup shoes that slide along the 3rd rail, forming a circuit to obtain car power. Since some gaps (crossing a surface street) are relatively long, a consist of two cars is usually long enough for the front pickup shoe to regain the 3rd rail before the rear shoe slips off the 3rd rail when making a crossing. The slider shoes typically arc when making and breaking contact with the 3rd rail; that's the source of those blue flashes of light. Due to the extreme danger of an exposed 3rd rail, the trackage must be controlled to preclude accidental or stupid public access. Subways and elevated lines are fairly inaccessible, but surface alignments present a real security problem. For instance, consider the Brown Line, where it crosses Francisco and Manor Streets. When you walk across the tracks within the public sidewalk alignment, if you look along the tracks, you will see the exposed 3rd rail only about ten feet away from you. Your dog or a child could easily dart in there and be killed, giving the CTA a major PR headache.

      about 1 year ago
    • tassiebaz
      tassiebaz In reply to Quentin Kirk

      Hi Quentin, From what I read , there was a Shore Line route that used the Evanston tracks and even continued farther to Waukegan. This route was abandoned in 1955. Regards, tassiebaz.

      about 1 year ago
    • Quentin Kirk
      Quentin Kirk In reply to Quentin Kirk

      tassiebaz Would You Happen To Know If The North Shore Line Used The Evanston Tracks?, I Know The Skokie Swift Was The North Shore Lines Original Tracks.

      about 1 year ago
    • Edward Davis
      Edward Davis

      I've always loved Chicago in a great part because of the "L" especially running downtown.... noisy, true, because of the open trestle work where newer systems have ballasted track, but the noise is part of the scene. Unsightly, NEVER, it is a work of mechanical and industrial art all in the eye of the beholder.. and unlike some thing preserved [mostly ancient artifacts by science] the "L" serve a very valuable purpose to the multitudes of area people.. CHEERS! Ed Davis

      about 1 year ago
    • Edward Davis
      Edward Davis In reply to Edward Davis

      I did gt to ride the 4000's both baldies and plushies in my 1961 and 1963 visits, on the 2nd visit I had missed North Shore by a week and the Lake line had been moved up to the CNW embankment before my 2nd visit. Most of the plushies had their poles removed and were mixed in with baldies, my set of 4000's [scratch built in S scale] is a mixed set of both types hadn't it been for the final stretch of Lake being moved upstairs it wouldn't be an accurate set. Never did ride the electroliners, always wanted the old North Shore cars since I like that era better, SHOULD have gone to Philly to ride them.. unfortunately they weren't very well styled for rapid transit service. If I can figure a way will send pix of my 4000's and 6000's.. Ed

      about 1 year ago
    • tassiebaz
      tassiebaz In reply to Edward Davis

      Hi Ed, I am really happy that technology has provided a way to share my memories with those who have a similar interest. I never rode the North Shore (wish I had), but I did get to ride the old "L" cars and the trolleybus system in Chicago. Also, I rode the Electroliners when they ran in Philadelphia on the P&W. Regards, tassiebaz.

      about 1 year ago
    • Edward Davis
      Edward Davis In reply to Edward Davis

      And thanx for the video productions shared.I was in CHI in 1961 an had the GRAND opportunity to ride North Shore several times.. Ed

      about 1 year ago
    • tassiebaz
      tassiebaz In reply to Edward Davis

      Hi Edward, I agree that Chicago couldn't function without the "L", and that it's part of the ambiance of that delightful city. Regards, tassiebaz.

      about 1 year ago
    • Bob Zwolinski
      Bob Zwolinski

      Thanks for posting this! I grew up in Chicago from 1955 - 1979. I didn't know at the time that I was a transit enthusiast. This brings back a ton of memories! Thanks again!

      about 1 year ago
    • tassiebaz
      tassiebaz In reply to Bob Zwolinski

      Hi Bob, Thanks for taking the time to comment. I love the "good old days" and the older equipment that was operated. I am happy that technology has provided a way to share these memories, Regards, tassiebaz.

      about 1 year ago
    • Lockbar
      Lockbar

      Great memories here. Back in the early 70's I'd ride the swift up to Dempsster to do some shopping at a long gone hobby shop located a couple of blocks from the station. I think the cost of the transfer from Howard street was 20 cents. Almost brings a tear to my eye.

      about 1 year ago
    • Quentin Kirk
      Quentin Kirk In reply to Lockbar

      Lockbar was Kaufman's Deli On Dempster St Back Then?

      about 1 year ago
    • brushcreek42
      brushcreek42

      Very nicely photographed! My brother, my 6 year old daughter and I rode a train inbound from Jefferson Park on the opening day of the Kennedy Rapid Transit line in 1970 and were rear ended by a train following too closely in the new subway. There was a lot of screaming and broken windows, but I don't think anyone was seriously injured although the fire dept. and ambulances arrived. I had a sore neck for a couple of weeks. The only train wreck I've been in.

      about 1 year ago
    • fnihp30
      fnihp30 In reply to brushcreek42

      brushcreek42 Do you know why the signal system didn’t work to warn the train about getting to close?

      about 7 months ago
    • tassiebaz
      tassiebaz In reply to brushcreek42

      Hi brushcreek42, Thanks for your comment. I was at that Kennedy Rapid Transit inauguration in 1970, but luckily didn't get involved in the incident you described. Glad you enjoyed the video. tassiebaz

      about 1 year ago
    • tassiebaz
      tassiebaz

      Hi adelgado75,'

      Thanks for taking the time to comment. I'm glad you enjoyed the presentation. tassiebaz

      about 1 year ago
    • adelgado75
      adelgado75

      So great that some one filmed this.

      about 2 years ago