In this video Bogi from All Girls Garage, EricTheCarGuy, and Humble Mechanic chat about the automotive industry. How and why we went to tech school, what opportunities it gave us as technicians, the struggles for techs, and what the future might hold for auto mechanics. Thanks to Universal Technical Institute for helping make this possible.

~~~~ FULL AUDIO ~~~~
Part 1 ~ bit.ly/2P39uMp
Part 2 ~ COMING SOON
Part 3 ~ COMING SOON
Part 4 ~ COMING SOON

Bogi's Garage ~ www.youtube.com/user/180Automotive
EricTheCarGuy ~ www.youtube.com/user/ETCG1
Learn more about Universal Technical Institute (where I went to tech school) ~ bit.ly/2BHLclV
UTI on Youtube ~ bit.ly/2wkdwES

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~~~~ Recommended Tools ~~~~
Impact driver ~ amzn.to/2HsxS2H
Small Impact driver ~ amzn.to/2DZdsMN
Electric ratchet ~ amzn.to/2FydxMS
Magnetic tray ~ amzn.to/2FEpQ6g
Basic hand tools ~ amzn.to/2GnjF7K
Box wrench set ~ amzn.to/2FzoJch
ScrewDriver set ~ amzn.to/2FEjcgd
Shop towels ~ amzn.to/2FC7UgM
Torque Wrench ~ amzn.to/2I7ke5h
Allen Sockets ~ amzn.to/2GlcnAz
Torx Sockets ~ amzn.to/2pL0SfL

~~~~ Playlists ~~~~
Humble Mechanic Podcasts ~ www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLwfzU5uvU-lKLEvGiyabJxxazND2S7lC-
Project White Wookie ~ www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLwfzU5uvU-lJpDFuyOTudNRrlTdTRihqk
Failed VW parts videos ~ www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLwfzU5uvU-lIxxNMAO-nNe4c3Liohrrr-
Tool and Product Reviews ~ www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLwfzU5uvU-lKA_oaxAkY0KKTvS4cxuPA7
How To videos ~ www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLwfzU5uvU-lKM-_ShLfG-IrNqklIp0_To
MK1 VR6 Swap Videos ~ www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLwfzU5uvU-lKJ09uR9evf987LmSuijY-p

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Comments

    • HumbleMechanic
      HumbleMechanic

      Thanks for watching everyone. I am working hard to get that full audio out for you guys. I think you are going to love love love the full conversation!

      about 7 months ago
    • HumbleMechanic
      HumbleMechanic In reply to HumbleMechanic

      That’s 100% situational. It could go either way.

      about 6 months ago
    • IndependentAutoTechnician
      IndependentAutoTechnician In reply to HumbleMechanic

      just curious do you guys actually believe in this day and age with the internet that 2 guys that start at the same time, one at a shop and one at automotive school the guy at school will surpass the guy starting at the shop? I believe the guy starting at the shop in this day in age far surpasses the tech school grad and instead spends that 50k into tools and equipment

      about 6 months ago
    • Kent Simon
      Kent Simon In reply to HumbleMechanic

      Glad you guys did this, I now have you as another car mechanic you-tuber to watch, this is how I found you.

      about 7 months ago
    • Xander Smith
      Xander Smith In reply to HumbleMechanic

      I'm a mix of school and shop experience. Did 2 years of automotive school and at a community college then 2 years of diesel at another while working as much as I could at the same time. Been in the diesel mechanic side for 6 years now and a mechanic for 10 total now and I wish they would have told us in school that this industry is a tough one and you are going to know the tool truck guy by name.

      about 7 months ago
    • Vegan Cyclist
      Vegan Cyclist In reply to HumbleMechanic

      thanks for making mechanics approachable again.

      about 7 months ago
    • envisionmustang
      envisionmustang

      I love watching you all make videos about the automotive Industry I am a tech right now with a few Ase and love my job and will one day here soon will open my own shop. I’m glad to see every bit of info you all put out to the world to let people know about automotive

      about 1 month ago
    • Ian Zulick
      Ian Zulick

      Bogi's story makes me feel like I'm not so alone in my own path to becoming a technician. I also got a four-year degree only to realize I wanted nothing more to do with that field once I was done with it. College is something kids are pushed into rather unfairly because of the elitist notion that only jobs with degrees are worthy of respect. I love working on cars and am glad I chose to start doing something fulfilling instead of sitting mindlessly behind a desk collecting a paycheck.

      about 2 months ago
    • HumbleMechanic
      HumbleMechanic In reply to Ian Zulick

      AWESOME!

      about 2 months ago
    • Nathan Kutchko
      Nathan Kutchko

      I applied for a entry level tech position at a lexus dealership because i wanted to get back into automotive. But then they gave me the option to be a service advisor assistant with higher start pay instead of tech if i want to, now i dont know what to choose 😶

      about 3 months ago
    • Nathan Kutchko
      Nathan Kutchko In reply to Nathan Kutchko

      +HumbleMechanic thanks for the response! I definitley agree thats why i decided to apply in the first place so i accepted the position as a tech

      about 3 months ago
    • HumbleMechanic
      HumbleMechanic In reply to Nathan Kutchko

      It really boils down to which will make you happier. Turning wrenches or working with customers. You can always move around the dealer if you end up not liking the roll

      about 3 months ago
    • Mig Boca
      Mig Boca

      One thing I think you guys should have talked about is tuition cost. Especially since this is sponsored by UTI, I graduated from WyoTech in 2011 and tuition was around 34k, at the time UTI was roughly the same. I don't know what tech school costs today but I'm sure its still very expensive. I was very fortunate to have landed a mechanic position in Afghanistan for a defense company soon after graduation. This allowed me to pay off my tuition debt within my first year in the field, but I know several people who weren't as lucky. They work more average mechanic jobs at dealers and mom and pop shops and several years after graduating they are still in debt working to pay off student loans. Not to say a person shouldn't go to tech school, but tuition costs should also be openly discussed as it will have a huge impact on people's career when loans are their only way of paying for school.

      about 3 months ago
    • Mig Boca
      Mig Boca In reply to Mig Boca

      I absolutely agree, there's pros and cons and isn't for everyone. My suggestion is to discus tuition costs more openly. I feel most people don't realize just how expensive it can be. I know I didn't.. Another option is automotive technology at a local community college, way more affordable. Sure it may take a little longer than UTI but again it comes down to an individuals situation. Thanks for the reply!+HumbleMechanic

      about 3 months ago
    • HumbleMechanic
      HumbleMechanic In reply to Mig Boca

      It’s mixed for me. Yes tech school is $$$$.

      But what is it compared to a 4yr college? What about starting wages?

      We’d pay someone that was from UTI at least $5 more per hour on day one. Plus they were a head of the guys coming off the street. It’s NOT for everyone but if you capitalize on the time at school you’ll probably be a head

      about 3 months ago
    • Jonas Courtney
      Jonas Courtney

      Only thing that I say is whatever you do, be careful, don't get hurt. Believe me money can not buy your health back. I regret braking my back and at my age figure it out that working on cars gets me so much more satisfaction than my actual job. So don't get hurt.

      about 4 months ago
    • HumbleMechanic
      HumbleMechanic In reply to Jonas Courtney

      TRUTH! If I could tell my younger self anything, it would be to take better care of myself.

      about 4 months ago
    • Jules Arnold
      Jules Arnold

      I like your videos and it's a good conversation. I would only add to anyone thinking of getting into mechanics.....avoid schools like UTI. Find your local community college or similar program, study hard and stay away from snap on and the expensive tool brands. DO NOT get into serious debt, it will kill your mental state of mind. There are many op quality tools for a fraction of the price and pretty good tool boxes for 1/10th of the price of snap on. It's going to take many many years to be really good, enjoy the ride and if you are cautious and extremely careful about the "loan sharking" style credit in this industry, you will be much happier and wealthier later down the road. Best of luck.

      about 4 months ago
    • misha
      misha

      You guys made a lot of good points. Great job :)

      about 5 months ago
    • Stevo Reno
      Stevo Reno

      When I went to UTI in Pheonix in 1975 , it was 9 months and cost $ 2,200.00 Bucks.
      NOW
      Its $ 40,000.00 for 1 year and thats just the Automotive part of it, Diesel is EXTRA !!
      So explain to all the cost of UTI or other options.

      about 5 months ago
    • HumbleMechanic
      HumbleMechanic In reply to Stevo Reno

      $2200 WOW! I am sure the campus is a different place today than 40 years ago,. Does that justify the cost difference? That is up to each individual. I think it was around $25k for automotive when I went.

      about 5 months ago
    • David Cantrell
      David Cantrell

      Allen A, I agree that the parts part needs to have a regulated standard markup. However, to completely overhaul the auto repair industry would greatly effect the independent shops that are not affiliated with the brand name dealerships. I do believe that the shady shops that do bad work, rip the public off need to be put out of business . There does need to be some sort of overight when it comes to the independent shops.

      about 5 months ago
    • April Morone
      April Morone

      Working on cars is like, "Aww. I get to work on precious things (cars) that are awesome things in general and that are also awesome cus of how it works."

      about 5 months ago
    • April Morone
      April Morone

      I was fixing VCRs and Nintendo game systems, then computers, software. But, I also have a brother who was fixing cars, and he taught me a tiny bit about it. The irony is that now, he sells car insursnce and I am in college for Automotive Analysis and Repair and am gettting my Masters in Engineering: Computer Science so that I can code PCMs and other modules of vehicles.

      about 5 months ago
    • April Morone
      April Morone In reply to April Morone

      +HumbleMechanic Thank you. :)

      about 5 months ago
    • HumbleMechanic
      HumbleMechanic In reply to April Morone

      That’s awesome!!!

      about 5 months ago
    • April Morone
      April Morone

      Am in Automotive Analysis and Repair programme, now. And, I just passed my Automotive Electrical and Automotive Braking ASE exams, last week.

      about 5 months ago
    • 233monte
      233monte

      hey charles, what happened to the 4 part full audio version of this on the podcast channel?

      about 5 months ago
    • HumbleMechanic
      HumbleMechanic In reply to 233monte

      This is part 4, there are links to the other 3 here too. I Think you will REALLY love full version

      https://humblemechanic.com/podcast/automotive-industry-opportunities-obstacles-full-audio-part-4-4/

      about 5 months ago
    • Torqued by Tim
      Torqued by Tim

      It’s so funny how common this really is. I received my associates degree and went straight to tech school. There really is a need for good techs in my area. I would not be where I am now in this career field if it were not for going to tech school. I see a lot of negative comments made about these tech schools, but in the end you get out of it what you put in to your training while there and after leaving.

      about 6 months ago
    • Jlow2x
      Jlow2x

      At UTI is the program a technical diploma or degree when you finish?

      about 6 months ago
    • HumbleMechanic
      HumbleMechanic In reply to Jlow2x

      I think it’s more like a certificate

      about 6 months ago
    • michael crumlett
      michael crumlett

      Fellow UTI grad here. I was utterly horrified when one of my recent applicants mentioned how much he owed UTI. It’s starting to cost as much as a four year. I’d recommend shopping around before committing to any path for training, particularly for people interested in becoming dealer or retail techs. Carrying a student loan as the oil change guy is just not going to work out.

      The best advice in this video is to look into city garages and diesel technology. Hourly pay and government benefits make a huge difference for any technician, and working on fire apparatus and heavy equipment is interesting and challenging.

      about 7 months ago
    • HumbleMechanic
      HumbleMechanic In reply to michael crumlett

      I think looking at all the options is great advice!!!!

      about 6 months ago
    • David Rose
      David Rose

      When i was 26 i had no experience working on vehicles. I enlisted with the army guard (part time soldier) as an all wheeled vehicle mechanic. Had three months training sitting behind a computer. Maybe eight hours hands on. On the civilian side I stayed in security because i stilled didn't have enough experience. Mazda hired me two years later as an express tech. The guy who trained me there has been a tech for Mazda for 30 years, i learned a lot from him. Everything from how to use a tire machine how to buy quality tools without going into debt. He was my tech school. The experience at mazda was what hlped me get a good job at the county as a truck/equipment tech. Basically I'm just saying you don't have to go to Tech School to be a good technician. But i think it would help a lot. I was lucky to be trained by someone who honestly cared.

      about 7 months ago
    • original abesha
      original abesha

      It gets old quick! It's different when you do it as hobby!

      about 7 months ago
    • PAULY'S AUTO
      PAULY'S AUTO

      Going to tech school is great, but never underestimate the value of working as a general service tech for the first five years and how much it takes to be a thorough and effective tech In 10, 15, 20 years!

      You can get your degree, but if you have never spent time busting your ass doing thorough inspection's, LOF's, basic engine, suspension, steering, and brake system diagnosis and repair, difficult alignments, tire repairs, timeliness, getting your ass chewed by your service manager's, dealing with know it all's, bad customer's, broken fasteners, bad calls, RUST and RUST, how to properly use and repair shop equipment, working with broken tools and equipment, losing sleep over difficult problems, and remember that college will only give you about 10% of what it will TRULY take and what awaits you in this business!

      You can't just skip over what REALLY makes a technician well rounded and capable of self teaching, selling the job, spot checking/leading younger techs, getting over it, doing it right, and THEN being able to diagnose the difficult problems, have three different cars torn apart only to be stopped several times to do this or that, but wait did you pay that tool bill yet to even be effective at what you are doing, and I'm only scratching the surface of what "obstacles" you will have to overcome if you want to be "good" at this profession!

      Going into this business without a degree from higher education isn't going to make or break you in terms of $$$! You have to earn respect and demonstrate that you have the basics mastered first, that comes from experience in the field...PERIOD! Having the Master Tech status needs to mean something, was it earned 100% with time in the field or did you just think that a school or passing exams would automatically give you credibility and skills? You cannot just walk into the shop and expect to be taken seriously if you cannot demonstrate that you have put in your time from general service all the way to lead tech!

      Bottom line, go slow and actually grasp each area and understand that it is going to take a minimum of 15 years before you will get to a level in which you will know that you are TRULY a Master at this profession!

      The biggest obstacle a person coming into this business has is not lack of higher education by any means, the biggest obstacles are committing to this type of work, humility, honesty, and good old fashioned work ethic! Education is called post secondary for a reason, either you are lazy and greedy or you are not!

      Education will give you the tools to self educate along the way, but don't think that the guy who DID become a Master Tech without any college education through the struggle to earn his credibility and respect by putting in his time from the ground floor is ever going to take you seriously, until you can demonstrate that you have at least mastered the basics of general service, put in your legitimate time doing general service, and furthermore are TRULY willing to put aside your OFTEN TIMES HUGE EGO and sense of entitlement from that piece of paper you have neatly stamped on your resume! Don't fool yourself into thinking that you can just fake it and get by, this business spots phonies and poser wannabes very swiftly! That older guy working in the bay next to you can spot this within your first two weeks, so be honest with yourself and never underestimate those who have done their time!

      Never underestimate how important it is to spend your time doing the "grunt" work and how getting to the level you want to be respected as is going to take ALOT and I mean ALOT of hard work doing what you didn't necessarily want right away!

      Those who get out of the business have done so for a reason, good, bad, or whatever, just remember that it is NOT a job for the weak minded, overly sensative, and greedy mindset, if you think six figures is coming to you because you got yourself a degree...lol you are likely going to quit this profession! Your either a lifer or you're not, and it's as simple as that!

      General Service Tech position's are in SUPER high demand right now, why do you think that is? Because too many damn people think that somehow by going to school that it will somehow magically qualify and get them past those REAL LIFE "obstacles" that are going to be there regardless of how much education you have...nope...so sorry, but you will have to do at least 5 years as a general service tech (IF YOU MAKE IT THAT LONG) with or without any school if you TRULY want to EARN the respect and credibility from those in the field.

      Trust me, the days of walking in off the street to get into this profession are alive and well...the real question is, do you have what it TRULY takes to become the REAL Master Tech like the one's that are probably nodding their head at what I just laid down for you to pickup and digest?

      about 7 months ago
    • Sarah Gorham
      Sarah Gorham In reply to PAULY'S AUTO

      WORD WORD WORD!!!!!!! Yes! Thank you! Thanks for putting me back in my place lol. I'm a Pep Boys GST, 6 months into it, taking online automotive classes through Penn Fosters career diploma program to supplement my shop experience (it's only $800 for the whole thing but so far really helpful to form a foundation for me) and I got my fixer upper project car to supplement all of that. My path doesn't look like the kids' outta high school going to UTI...but I've got enough drive, smarts and hard work to get to where I'm going....and I know I'm gonna get there one day soon.

      Kids these days don't know that respect and success are earned, not given.

      Your right, show up early, work hard, be extremely observant in the shop to what other techs are doing (I've learned lots of little random things just in passing a guy's bay and seeing what he's doing) and all in all, good things take time. The most successful people in the world have gotten there because they worked the hardest.

      Pep boys is a stepping stone for me - I'm getting out of the Bay Area and moving to WA next year....planning on getting into heavy equipment/diesel because I don't see myself enjoying working on all electric/hybrid cars in the coming years. 😖 it'll feel like starting over again, bit shop experience is shop experience. 👍👍👍

      about 2 months ago
    • PAULY'S AUTO
      PAULY'S AUTO In reply to PAULY'S AUTO

      For example paying for Scannerdanner Premium is on point, just get me what I need to know to be successful on my time, affordable, no prescription requirement from some higher education and beuracratic department of some government agency!

      Too much money is wasted on classes that are not necessarily needed to be successful in the professional world on multiple fronts!

      I think that this will change as more and more younger people catch on to this scam we call higher education and the real goal to force feed society social courses that change nothing except the wallets of administrators and their unions!

      The sooner a young man or woman can get into the field and begin working the better off they will be in terms of development of invaluable skill sets. Education is to formal and lacks flexibility and enginuety for the information available to people these days.

      We can shortcut the BS and pay teachers to teach their customers (students) however it is most effective for their experience and expertise! Cut out administrative nonsense and give me the opportunity to take and pay out of pocket for what I want to be knowledgeable about at the moment.

      Try rolling into tech school or any formal college and taking a class on English, Math, diagnostics, brakes, or hydraulics whatever individually...um no, you gotta go through some mandatory prerequisites in shit like "new to college life" which doesn't make me money, the forced curriculum that wastes time and money for society and the students!

      That my friend is the REAL problem, our great teachers cannot free lance or choose how to teach, they are forced to follow a predetermined agenda that limits our potential for growth in terms of quality and protects unwanted subjects in social science's that have no value to a guy trying to get to it and be a professional technician!

      about 7 months ago
    • PAULY'S AUTO
      PAULY'S AUTO In reply to PAULY'S AUTO

      +HumbleMechanic Will do, love the conversation!

      Education is also flawed in this country as it does not allow a person to pick and choose what they need to know to be successful. Rather it forces useless class requirements that cost too much $$$ to just get to the point already and let me customize my education needs to get on with my career goals as soon as possible for a reasonable PRICE!

      about 7 months ago
    • HumbleMechanic
      HumbleMechanic In reply to PAULY'S AUTO

      I Think that is where some of the issues come from. People expecting master techs coming right out of tech school. It's just STUPID!


      There is no better teacher than experience. And I agree that you can still get a job off the street as long as its the right environment. Sadly the right environments are rare.


      I recommend listening to the full version of this video. I am posting them in audio only format. We went a little deeper in the subject.

      about 7 months ago
    • Armstrong Racing
      Armstrong Racing

      Great video. I gave 10 years to Subaru at the dealership and was never able to feel satisfied. Highest certified tech and a team leader, still never made more than $60k annual. Dealerships use people as laborers, so don’t put them on a pedestal. Experience all brands and take the ASE’s, you can learn a lot.

      about 7 months ago
    • Armstrong Racing
      Armstrong Racing In reply to Armstrong Racing

      You’re completely right, I was never allowed to display any of my personal business cards and was actually discouraged from communication with customers. This was my main complaint to management, they put policy before people......yet they always teach the opposite.

      about 7 months ago
    • HumbleMechanic
      HumbleMechanic In reply to Armstrong Racing

      I totally understand. I think the disconnect comes from lack of communication. on all parts.

      about 7 months ago
    • Armstrong Racing
      Armstrong Racing In reply to Armstrong Racing

      That's a valid point, but I did feel like I had more of a meaningful purpose at the independent shops. I'm sure you can relate to how disconnected dealer techs are from the customer, and maybe that's part of why the dealerships are trusted less.

      about 7 months ago
    • HumbleMechanic
      HumbleMechanic In reply to Armstrong Racing

      Something to keep in mind is ALL employers use people as laborers.

      I do think experiencing. All brands is a great idea

      about 7 months ago
    • Tyler D Ruyle
      Tyler D Ruyle

      Hey there guys, so I have a question. I have almost 13 years of experience in the automotive world, I've done everything from A/C work to performance suspension and stroker engine builds. I don't personally feel that going to school would benefit me much knowledge wise, I feel it would be a waste of money. Should I just go to school anyways to get credentials to help towards my ASE or should I just prove myself through a shop or dealership? I've worked in shops for a couple years but most of my work was private contract or a mobile mechanics setup in a box van.

      Thanks in advance 😁

      about 7 months ago
    • Tyler D Ruyle
      Tyler D Ruyle In reply to Tyler D Ruyle

      yeah i figured as much for the full blown tech school as it seems i would be wasting a substantial amount of money on information i already have, im thinking it might be best to take community college courses on areas i'm not 100% efficient and confident on such as A/C, Automatic Trans rebuilds, Etc. and then work under a dealer or other ASE Certified shop to get my 2 years of work experience so i can qualify for my ASE Cert And then i feel i would be a lot more likely to be successful when opening my own shop! also might be a good idea to take a few business ethics and relating classes to help with understanding what it takes to properly run a business.

      Thank you for your time Charles!!!

      about 7 months ago
    • HumbleMechanic
      HumbleMechanic In reply to Tyler D Ruyle

      I might look at other training than the traditional tech school. You have the foundation with experience. But I will also say it may be worth talking to them to see if it would be a good fit.

      about 7 months ago
    • Mike Hagan
      Mike Hagan

      As a high school automotive instructor I understand all of this. I've had several past students attend UTI, UNOH, nadc etc always successful. I think it creates drive. In our area there are many opportunities and this industry is at critical mass trying to find those to fill it. Yes please spread the word so parents can be more supportive. It means a lot to them and me as there advocate

      about 7 months ago
    • Zachary Lyman
      Zachary Lyman

      I went to the campus in Avondale az, lirerally with the main mentality of I wanna make cars go fast, but I more enjoy diagnosing cars.

      about 7 months ago
    • HumbleMechanic
      HumbleMechanic In reply to Zachary Lyman

      NICE! I think being open minded to that stuff is very important

      about 7 months ago
    • Silver Stacker
      Silver Stacker

      i have 2002 VW Passat b5.5 tdi pd 130 is there any other brake calliper's, that will fit  most of the second hand ones are just rust . do the Audi a6 c6 tdi 2.0 year 04 callipers fit or can you tell me which do ..any help would be good lov you video keep it up ...uk England

      about 7 months ago
    • Bruce Oliver
      Bruce Oliver

      I don't think any one wants to be a mediocre tech. They just don't have the drive to become better. And I think a lot of techs have never been around anything but mediocre, or less, technicians. So they don't realize they are mediocre techs. They don't know what they don't know. Especially if they were always an Indy tech that was never exposed to training beyond tech school.

      about 7 months ago
    • Flat Rate Master
      Flat Rate Master

      Loving this Series Charles great to 3 icons of this industry supporting the next generation of techs!

      about 7 months ago
    • Tj Davis
      Tj Davis

      SHOUTout to Urinal Tract Infection (UTI)? 😂😂
      jk....good video you all 😎

      about 7 months ago
    • HumbleMechanic
      HumbleMechanic In reply to Tj Davis

      HAHA

      about 7 months ago
    • David Cantrell
      David Cantrell

      As a tech my goal was to be up front and honest with my customers. My integrity means more to me than a pay check any day. I remember working for one Honda dealership that did not allow the techs to talk to the customer because of their shady practices, this in part is why I believe the general public does not trust autoshops. We as techs need to be honest with our customers and give them the absolute best we possibly can , after all, they are the ones who pay us to maintain their rides.

      about 7 months ago
    • Allen A
      Allen A In reply to David Cantrell

      David Cantrell I believe auto repair industry needs an upgrade or over haul , their should be a a state mandated parts mark up percentage .

      about 5 months ago
    • Hassan Eido
      Hassan Eido

      I see Eric I click like .

      about 7 months ago