SUBSCRIBE HERE!! www.youtube.com/kevinhunter7 How do you buy a car from a dealership, with cash, with no credit, with bad credit? Here are the best car buying tips available today! See our latest video "TOP 10 Tips to get the BEST CAR DEAL" (10 best car buying tips / advice) at automobilrevue.net/v/TGlrNmQwbWNOcDQ Are you a savvy car shopper who needs a little car buying advice? Kevin Hunter hosts "The Business Forum Show" outlines the 13 car mistakes to avoid making at the dealership. See the new video on "Getting Pre-Approved on Car Loans!" at automobilrevue.net/v/OEtTbUIzSEU5MEU
CATEGORIES: car, truck, suv, auto, used cars, autos, mechanic, automobile, vehicle, dealer, automotive news, auto shop, warranty.

People in the car business who profit from your mistakes by taking advantage of you will rant about things we share here and disagree with the content, but don't be fooled by their rhetoric. A dishonest car salesperson absolutely loves an ignorant car shopper. We will try to help you avoid the common mistakes, and assist you in sorting the facts from the baloney in this business. We profit nothing regardless of what you choose to do, and we don't mind if you choose to not use the information. If you do, you'll find yourself walking away with a much better car deal. If you don't, you don't have much room to complain when this stuff happens.

How do Car Dealers rip you off? This video presents 13 different car buying mistakes that you can't afford to make when car shopping. If you're going to car shop and don't want to be taken advantage of, it's up to you to learn about car salesmen and auto dealerships, and the dirty tricks they play to rip people off. You also need to learn about the scams and inappropriate products sold by both new and used car dealers, and why some things dealers offer should NEVER be purchased. These include things like the theft protection scam, GAP insurance that is sold to consumers who either didn't need it, or could have purchased much cheaper from their own insurance agent, and extended warranties that are often sold to buyers who didn't want them or need them. To make matters worse, there are also thousands of car dealers who employ finance officers that are some of the most unscrupulous people you'll ever meet, willing to tell you any lie they can come up with to sell you everything I've described, and more. The worst ones will even claim your interest rate on your loan is only available if you buy all the added products they are proposing. They claim the 'bank' wants the car protected.... which is BS... On the contrary, the bank wants your loan as small as possible so if they need to repossess the car, they can get their money out of it.

This video was published to help you discover how you can save time and money on your next new or used car purchase by doing your homework first, and then going car shopping as an informed buyer.

Is it unreasonable to expect a little old-fashioned honesty? We don't think so, but we are more than amused by the countless car salespeople or car dealers who contact us and state that we are making a 'small problem' sound far worse than it is. They also tell us the entire video is completely fabricated baloney. Really? Are you kidding us? We know there are honest people in the car business, and we receive positive comments from many of them, but it's definitely a buyer beware world out on the car lot!

For all of you car buyers who are well steeped in reality, if you watched the video "Confessions of a car dealers backroom" you need to see this video. By understanding what mistakes to avoid, you'll not only become a smarter car buyer, but you'll also better understand what not to tell a car dealer when buying a car. It's true that you can play all your cards up front with an honest dealer, but unfortunately, they represent the minority of dealer owners (truly transparent and honest dealers make up about 40% of all dealers), and you are unlikely to know the difference until it's far too late. Be smart, do your homework, and you'll come home with a car deal that's good for you and the dealer. After all, that's what fairness is all about. We don't endorse anyone being ripped off, and that includes some customers who think it's 'justice' to turn tables and try to 'steal' a car from a dealer. If you do stuff like this, that makes you a crook too, doesn't it? When a car dealer loses money on a deal, they just take it from the next unsuspecting person. We don't think your neighbor should have to pay for your car, so we encourage you to be fair and honest. Everything we talk about has to do with fairness and honesty, and that works both ways. Respect the dealers right to make money in your quest to get a fair and honest car deal. It's this kind of attitude by car dealers and consumers alike that will change the car business.

Watch "Getting Pre-Approved on Car Loans!" at automobilrevue.net/v/OEtTbUIzSEU5MEU

Comments

    • Eden Roth
      Eden Roth

      1.4k thumb down from car sellers :))

      about 2 days ago
    • Random Videos
      Random Videos In reply to Eden Roth

      Eden Roth k

      about 2 days ago
    • american king
      american king

      your points are very true

      about 7 days ago
    • Amy McCain
      Amy McCain

      I've been in a little town called Manila or Leesville or blackoak

      about 8 days ago
    • Amy McCain
      Amy McCain

      I don't have a vehicle at all that's the reason why I'm only one but I would have to buy one around here in order to pay for it because I don't know how to drive in Memphis

      about 8 days ago
    • Amy McCain
      Amy McCain

      When can I know about buying the car here

      about 8 days ago
    • Amy McCain
      Amy McCain

      When can I know about buying the car here

      about 8 days ago
    • Amy McCain
      Amy McCain

      When can I know about buying the car here

      about 8 days ago
    • Amy McCain
      Amy McCain

      Can I buy the vehicle in Jonesboro arrival since I don't have no way there

      about 8 days ago
    • Lindsey Ormsbee
      Lindsey Ormsbee

      As a car salesman I want my customers to drive before they buy. Being completely transparent goes a long way for both parties.

      about 8 days ago
    • sammovies100
      sammovies100

      Thank You. Where have been all these years ?

      about 12 days ago
    • Darwin Lemon
      Darwin Lemon

      Yeah this is all well and good but the bottom line is, when your current vehicle is no longer useful, you're gonna have to buy another one. Of course you don't want to get ripped off, but you don't want to be on the bus stop with the hoodlums in the street either!! That's even worse because their job is to keep you from getting to your destination SAFELY!!!! You can't take the cheap way out all the damn time! If your budget is so tight that you have to watch every penny, maybe you shouldn't even be thinking about buying a car.

      about 17 days ago
    • Nikki Stixx
      Nikki Stixx In reply to Darwin Lemon

      And wolves zombie

      about 12 days ago
    • Kevin Hunter
      Kevin Hunter In reply to Darwin Lemon

      The video doesn't suggest that a car buyer should be a complete tightwad. What it does suggest is that car buyers ought to do a little homework and make a decision as an informed buyer. Pretty simple.

      about 17 days ago
    • Ballet Babe
      Ballet Babe

      Wow so glad I found this video. I was going to run to a dealer because of the end of year blowout. Luckily , I woke up with a migraine and I don't want to be rushed. Thanks for the video.

      about 18 days ago
    • Kevin Hunter
      Kevin Hunter In reply to Ballet Babe

      Glad you find this video. We also have a video on this channel on "How to beat the dealer finance office." It deals specifically with a number of things you can expect to be sold to you in dealer finance (if you let them). There are also videos that cover trades, dealer document fees, delivery fees, window etch theft protection, and others. Here's the bottom line. If a car buyer goes into a dealership without prior advice, and without having done the homework outlined in my videos, they can expect to pay $2,500 (on average) more than a smart car buyer. I am visiting with a car buyer right now who just bought a car in Florida. Here's what they did to him:


      1. Added $1,000 to the sale price of the car.
      2. Charged $279 for an nonexistent electronic filing fee.
      3. Charged $899 for a Document fee ($824 overcharge)
      4. Charged him $105 for a "Hope Scholarship."


      The starting sale price of the car was $13,426 on AutoTrader. You might ask... How do you go from $13,426, subtract $1,000 to get $12,426, subtract $5,000 to get $7,426... and end up with a loan of $15,561.40?



      Other fees and taxes were:
      Registration fee: $333.60
      License fee: $366.85
      Sales Tax: $1,256.94
      Vehicle State Tax: $839.33
      County Tax: $50
      Local Tax: $606
      Doc Stamps: $54.60


      He had a total of $21,561.40... before they took out the $1,000 rebate, and his $5,000 cash down.


      Assuming (which is not a good idea.. these dealers need to be checked on everything) the dealer did not cheat on the taxes and other fees, total fees and taxes are $3,507.32! Even if these numbers are fairly calculated (shame on you, Florida politicians!), the loan on this deal should look like this:


      $12,426
      $3,507.32 (state fees, taxes, registration, licensing, etc.
      $75 Dealer Doc fee (not $899)
      ---------------
      Sub Total of:
      $16,008.32
      - $5,000 cash down
      ---------------
      Total amount financed: $11,008.32


      In this example, the car buyer paid $4,553.08 MORE than he should have.


      When I say that the "average" car buyer can save $2,500 on every car deal by watching the videos on my channel, that is a very reasonable estimate. This buyer was screwed over much worse that a typical buyer, but he showed too many signs that he trusted the finance man, and the dealer took advantage of it. I hope you understand now that having a migraine when you did has saved you thousands of dollars. I hope you take full advantage of your new opportunity to be a very savvy car buyer!

      about 17 days ago
    • Mark Gonzalez
      Mark Gonzalez

      I walked out the dealership today. I wanted to trade in my car . I owe 13300. They offered 13000. (Jelly blue book says I could get a little more but I don’t know how that plays into the this) .. I wanted to get a 2019 Colorado . Msrp is 33200. With chevys discounts it’s 29,200 (4K discount) they tried to push for a 539 monthly payment. But I can’t do that. It was a 6.9 apr. I feel like they already getting cash on my trade in. And they won’t try to deal a lower payment. I follow most of the steps on how to deal with sales but at the end I don’t even know if it’s right. (Deal)

      about 19 days ago
    • paul visneau
      paul visneau In reply to Mark Gonzalez

      +Mark Gonzalez I bought a 17 Mazda 6 with zero interest, the car is almost paid off and had no issues with it.

      about 1 day ago
    • Xyankee Texan
      Xyankee Texan In reply to Mark Gonzalez

      Mark Gonzalez you were smart to walk out. 4K off isn’t that great of a deal.

      about 2 days ago
    • Mark Gonzalez
      Mark Gonzalez In reply to Mark Gonzalez

      paul visneau how did you solve your issue.

      about 10 days ago
    • paul visneau
      paul visneau In reply to Mark Gonzalez

      BE glad you didn't get it !  I dumped my 15 v6 colorado after 14 months hated it nothing but problems and it idled and shifted rough and had some quality issues

      about 10 days ago
    • Bond JamesBond
      Bond JamesBond

      Now back in UK iv just brought my wife a brand new mercedes est 200 petrol for £25k all in 👊👊😎

      about 19 days ago
    • Bond JamesBond
      Bond JamesBond

      My friend in America was going to buy a brand new f 150 Harley truck $65000 plus tax ECT and was going to pay full price !!! I stepped in !! Even after they showed us the receipt from ford for $45000 after an hour and a half walked out with it $40000 on the road !!! HAGEL them to death 👊👊👊👊😜😎

      about 19 days ago
    • Rita Cangialosi
      Rita Cangialosi

      My husband is pressuring me to make a decision by the end of the year (tomorrow) on a car because it will be used part of the time for business and he wants the write off for this year. However, I've had a difficult time test driving enough cars as I have a chronic pain condition so because of pain limitations I feel I've not tried enough cars (most are too difficult for me to get in and out of). I feel we're not prepared to make this decision by tomorrow and that the dealer will rush us to make a decision. The one car I like and that doesn't cause me pain has a sticker price of 45,000 (Nissan Murano) more then we want to pay, however again, I'm being rushed and maybe there is another car out there that is comfortable on my spine (spinal arthritis) and not quite so much $$$. What happens if we wait until January? It will give us more time to research...will incentives go away after 12/31? So out of my comfort zone here!

      about 19 days ago
    • Rita Cangialosi
      Rita Cangialosi In reply to Rita Cangialosi

      +Kevin Hunter Thank you these were my thoughts as well...we decided to wait and make a better more informed decision!

      about 17 days ago
    • Kevin Hunter
      Kevin Hunter In reply to Rita Cangialosi

      Very unlikely that you lose any incentives by waiting. In fact, if you are dealing with the current model year, the rebates will typically only go up. When dealers say incentives are ending, they are correct. What they don't tell you is that the incentives are usually even better the following month. Think about it. The incentives are from the manufacturer, who wants to move the product off the lot to make room for new stuff coming in. The longer the vehicle is there, the more incentives they will put on it to move it. This has always been true in the car business. There are very few exceptions to this rule.


      A few things to know about using a vehicle for tax write-offs. First, car dealers routinely do deals as many as five days into the following month, and back-date them for the previous month. Happens all the time. Also, talk to an accountant. Businesses buy things in January and still get credit for them on previous year taxes all the time. Here's a link that may also be helpful to you: https://www.marketwatch.com/story/use-your-car-for-your-small-business-the-new-tax-law-is-good-news-for-you-2018-03-06

      about 19 days ago
    • Ben Chesterman
      Ben Chesterman

      Government takes the most profit on cars in Australia 13% -51% tax on cars , Plus small business owner franchise is taxed 50% on turnover in Australia

      about 22 days ago
    • Ben Chesterman
      Ben Chesterman

      Bmw m3 pure is $97000 shipped to Australia , but its taxed $43000 = $140,000aud / luxury car tax 33% is $16000 = $3000 profit for the dealership lol . Im a Dealer in Australia

      about 22 days ago
    • Florie Mangona
      Florie Mangona

      I was trying to buy a pre-owned certified SUV from a dealer of the same brand in McKinney. I agreed on paying for the asking price of $15,900 plus the TT&L. I traded in my 2007 SUV which they valued at $5,000 and I added $7,000 as partial payment. The amount to be financed should therefore be $15,900 - $12,000= $3,900 plus TT&L of about $1500 or $5,400 to be financed. After all the computations based approved interest rate and 72 months. Final monthly amortization was $143.00 I agreed on this amount. At the finance officer's office I asked casually why it seemed too high. His answer "you're paying a total of $19,500". WHERE DID THAT AMOUNT COME FROM??. It's here in the document you signed he said. That's wrong I said. I'll check with the agent. Agent and Manager came rushing and explained to me I had to pay for the cost of the car's being "Certified-pre-owned" WHAT?? I was never told that. The woman manager countered it's in the fine print. It was stupid of the manager to say that. It's like admitting to the deception. I decided immediately I AM NOT BUYING THIS SUV!!!

      Two tricks they used
      1. Interest rate was too high 5.6%. I got lower rate of 4.6% with another dealer of the same brand

      2. They hid the out the door price by haggling through the monthly payments they proposed. It seemed acceptable to me until the finance officer quoted me the out the door price. I simply should have asked the agent the total I was paying (the out the door price).

      I never heard of a customer being required to pay for expenses incurred by the dealer to make a car Certified-pre-owned!

      Two days later I got an SUV of the same model, also certified owned but with lower mileage and same asking price of $15,900. Out the door price was $15,900 + TT&K, lower interest rate of 4.6% and monthly amortization of $101 for
      72 months.
      2.

      about 22 days ago
    • Kevin Hunter
      Kevin Hunter In reply to Florie Mangona

      Thanks for sharing the details of your SUV purchasing experience. Sadly, your first experience with the dealer in McKinney is not that unusual. Dealer owners push their finance guys to get as much out of a customer as they can, and when you started showing signs that your interest was a low monthly payment, they thought they could fool you. Your experience is evidence that it always pays to ask questions, and when things don't make sense, be ready to drop the deal like a hot potato. A dishonest dealer does not deserve your business. Getting up and walking out is exactly what they had coming. I'm glad you found better people to help you in the end.

      about 22 days ago
    • teena333
      teena333

      Ugh! Car shopping is so tressful and salemen are soooo pushy!! :(

      about 23 days ago
    • Lorri Miller
      Lorri Miller In reply to teena333

      Push back by walking out.

      about 21 day ago
    • Kevin Hunter
      Kevin Hunter In reply to teena333

      You got it! You might ask, "With such a predatory sales model, where do they learn this stuff?" Interestingly, they train for it. New people who enter the car business are immersed in the same process the long-timers have been using for years, and nothing changes. I think it's funny that employees from some car dealers come on this channel to defend their business model, and to say that videos I've published to help car buyers with advice are complete nonsense. I know better, and many good people in the car business tell me constantly that they are glad someone is getting this information out there. It's buyers like you that I do this for, and I do hope you learned something that will help you with your next car purchase. Thanks for your comment!

      about 23 days ago
    • Mr Bee
      Mr Bee

      Purchased a new 7.50xi M-sport. Spent over $100k for this car. Has been at the dealerships service department almost more time than it’s been with me! One problem after another. From electronics that don’t work properly. To engine and break malfunctions.
      The only thing good I can say about it is the service department at the dealership I bought it from really tries to address the problems. But the car itself in my opinion is horrible!!
      I would never buy this car again!!!
      Stay tuned as will be coming out with videos and blogs detailing my experiences with this car.

      about 23 days ago
    • sombongi
      sombongi In reply to Mr Bee

      1 word. Lemon. A car reliability don't have to stress you that much especially if you bought it new and it's still new. That's why they have lemon laws

      about 11 days ago
    • Steve Schultz
      Steve Schultz In reply to Mr Bee

      Lemon law will apply if u no longer want it. BMW will buy it back.

      about 22 days ago
    • Frank Collins
      Frank Collins

      Why did he say "pay now" and yet then at the end he advises "take 24 hrs to think about it"!

      about 25 days ago
    • Zealot Zealot
      Zealot Zealot In reply to Frank Collins

      +Frank Collins Hey Frank, he was just quoting the dealers.

      about 9 days ago
    • star23j
      star23j In reply to Frank Collins

      +Kevin Hunter Your video is so helpful! And despite what this user is saying, you answered the questions quite well :-)

      about 21 day ago
    • Frank Collins
      Frank Collins In reply to Frank Collins

      +Kevin Hunter Well I get that obviously but you avoided my question.

      about 24 days ago
    • Kevin Hunter
      Kevin Hunter In reply to Frank Collins

      You misunderstood. All the "Pay Now" and "Buy Now" pressure is what you get from the dealership itself. You should not give in to that pressure, because they are pushing you into a decision that is good for them, not necessarily good for you. Take 24 hours to think about it. Sleep on it. Your mind will be much clearer the next morning when you are away from all that pressure, and then you can make the best decision for you.

      about 25 days ago
    • Andrew Borrs
      Andrew Borrs

      At least with state farm you can only get gap through them if you finance the car though state farm!

      about 26 days ago
    • Kevin Hunter
      Kevin Hunter In reply to Andrew Borrs

      You're referring to what State Farm Bank calls "Payoff Protector." It is indeed included with every vehicle loan they issue. It's similar to GAP insurance, performing the same kind of protection. People should understand that the likelihood of ever using GAP or Payoff Protector is .0018%. That's something they will never tell you in the finance office at an auto dealership.

      about 25 days ago
    • Luis Raul Fontanez
      Luis Raul Fontanez

      What advice do you have for people who pay cash, with a check, of course...

      about 27 days ago
    • Kevin Hunter
      Kevin Hunter In reply to Luis Raul Fontanez

      Great question, and very important that you understand why. You paying with cash cuts into dealer profits pretty significantly, so you'll have to keep that your little secret until the very end. If financing is mentioned to you, you simply respond, "I want to negotiate my car deal first. I'll look at what you have to offer later." Here's why this is a big deal. A typical car dealership makes money four different ways: 1. Finance, 2. Service, 3. Auto Parts & Accessories, 4. Sales. I listed them in this order for a reason. Sales is always last. Finance is always number 1 (the top money maker). Service and Auto Parts can vary from 2 to 3, but they are never last or first. Finance is always first, Sales is always last. Think about something. If you say you are paying cash the moment you walk through the door, you have told them that you are taking their number one money making option off the table (mostly off the table. They can still get you with a few products if you aren't paying attention). Auto loans allow the dealership a lot of options for packing in profits (they didn't make on the sale of the car) into the loan they are about to write for you. What do you think they will do with the car negotiations, when they know you will be a tough battle in finance as a cash buyer? Simple: They won't budge on anything... or very little. You end up paying more for the car than you planned, because you told them you're paying cash too early in the negotiations. So, when SHOULD you tell them you're paying cash? Not until you're sitting in the finance office. When they bring you loan apps out to complete (before your finance visit), you should decline to fill them out. Simply say you're open to financing, but want to talk to the finance officer before you do any paperwork. You can say you are concerned about confidentiality, and don't want to fill out loan applications anywhere else than a private finance office. They have no choice but to respect your wishes. Once you hit that seat in finance, you can ask "What rates do you have for a well qualified buyer?" You listen to the response. Assuming you are still unconvinced that financing is for you, and you want to just write that check... which is what I've always done... then you just politely decline the offers, and say you want to see the OTD price (out the door) of the car. You should have your sales price written down. Remember, the negotiations are already over, right? That number should be right in front of you. You add tax, title, license transfer fees to the price, and you have your total. Now, a couple other things to think about. They may try to hit you with huge fees... like a document fee for $1,000, or delivery fees for $500, or nitrogen filled tires for $400, or window etch theft protection for $699, etch. The list can go on. Watch our video on this channel about Document Fees (Dealer Doc Fees). They are the only additional fees you will have to take into consideration, and if they are over $75 dollars, just do as our video suggests. Here's the link for you: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=axko6_OHREU

      about 25 days ago
    • Keith Sage
      Keith Sage

      If its rusted under the body its been in salt water at one time....Get hell away from that car.

      about 27 days ago
    • Kevin Hunter
      Kevin Hunter In reply to Keith Sage

      There you go. No amount of rust protection in the world can help a car that has been submerged in water. If there's rust underneath, move along. You don't need some else's nightmare. Thanks for mentioning this!

      about 27 days ago
    • Shang T Sung
      Shang T Sung

      YALL ARE FN UP HARD 2019 CARS AND TRUCKS NO DIPSTICK TO CHECK THE OIL AND TRANSMISSION. IM PISS OFF AND MAD!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

      about 28 days ago
    • jeff jenkins
      jeff jenkins

      Ford escape

      about 29 days ago
    • Alex
      Alex In reply to jeff jenkins

      True, always escape from buying a Ford.

      about 28 days ago
    • starman1968ful
      starman1968ful

      Another great new car dealer scam is allowing the potential buyer to take the car home (after checking their credit first. They know, once the car is in the potential buyers driveway and the neighbors have seen the car, it's VERY difficult to take the car back to the dealer.

      about 1 month ago
    • Lindsey Ormsbee
      Lindsey Ormsbee In reply to starman1968ful

      How evil of the dealership to allow the buyer to take it home for the night and think on it.....

      about 8 days ago
    • Kevin Hunter
      Kevin Hunter In reply to starman1968ful

      Yes, this is called the "Spot Delivery." There's a reason why they do this, beyond getting you home in the car. Once they know they can get a car deal done for the buyer, they like to send you out the door and have you come back on a day when they have fewer customers to help. Saturdays are a great example of when this happens the most. With a flood of people on the showroom floor, they want to defer the qualified buyers to come back on a day when the finance office has little or nothing to do. As you've already pointed out, by sending you home in the car (instead of just sending you home), you continue to sell yourself on owning this new vehicle, and are very unlikely to want to return it. Thanks for your comment! Good car buying advice comes from many different sources!

      about 1 month ago
    • Vincent Venturella
      Vincent Venturella

      None of These Suggestions Protects you, the Consumer, from the Inevitable. Cars are Mechanical Wonders with Over 2.5 Miles of Wire, and Thus Prone to Break Down, outside of Routine Recommended Maint. Intervals. Some are Lemons, w/o Question. Ya Just Never KNOW ! LOL VJVMD

      about 1 month ago
    • Vincent Venturella
      Vincent Venturella

      The Internet is a Great Resource, and so are it's Multiple Sites USE IT ! Before you BUY ! VJVMD

      about 1 month ago