GBatteries Energy, a father-son company based out of Ottawa, believes that they have developed a method that would enable lithium batteries to charge far faster than they currently due using the constant-current, constant-voltage (CCCV) method.

Based on computer modeling, they believe that their method would recharge a Bolt EV battery to 50% in five minutes and to 100% in 10 minutes (a 6 C rate compared to the Bolt EV battery cell's rated 1 C charging rate).

If true, this would be the most important EV innovation of the modern era, and it would enable EVs with current battery technology to replace internal combustion and fuel cell vehicles, even on long trips.

www.gbatteries.com/

Comments

    • GBatteries
      GBatteries

      Thanks for the coverage!

      about 1 month ago
    • News Coulomb
      News Coulomb In reply to GBatteries

      You're welcome! I can't wait to see how this develops!

      about 1 month ago
    • Ronald Garrison
      Ronald Garrison

      I have a nuclear fusion reactor that can fit on the back of a pickup truck, so we can easily handle all these fast chargers, nooooo problem.

      about 1 month ago
    • Ronald Garrison
      Ronald Garrison In reply to Ronald Garrison

      @News Coulomb It was a JOKE. I'll assume you got it.

      about 1 month ago
    • News Coulomb
      News Coulomb In reply to Ronald Garrison

      No need to carry a fusion reactor with you. We have one overhead.

      about 1 month ago
    • gernblanston99
      gernblanston99

      B.S. sham science.
      No evidence, no independent verification, no nothing.
      Snake oil for the 21st century.

      about 3 months ago
    • Poker Channel
      Poker Channel

      Hoax. Reported. Fake news!!! Shame!!!!

      about 3 months ago
    • Trevor Kemp
      Trevor Kemp

      Actually with pulse charging like this you would only be on charge for half the time the car is Plugged in which actually means you would need chargers that are 720 kW To give you a 10 minute charge time on a 60 Kilowatt battery to charge it from 0 to 100% in 10 minutes This does also mean that you would have the requirements of necessity of high capacity on site storage Batteries Because without completely replacing the entire electrical grid that now exists around the world there's no way you could replace gas stations with electric vehicle charging stations like this and have all that power delivered on demand by the grid but the advantage to the battery storage solutions that would have to be in place for this would mean That even if the grid goes down you can still charge your electric vehicle as well as some businesses would still have power because of the power storage solutions around them Plus 1 of the issues with this would also be thermal management it would definitely cause the car's batteries to get hot if you charge them that quickly meaning that the on board battery cooling systems will need to be upgraded To be able to handle 3 to 4 times more kilowatts worth of cooling then they are currently capable of meaning you would need active battery cooling of 18 to 24 kW Unless the charger was providing a high flow rate of coolant to be pumped through the car's battery But that Provides other issues such as how to keep all of the Coolant contained when Unplugging the charger from the car The solution would lie in semi solid state batteries with a charge density of a non solid state battery To implement this technology on something like the Chevrolet bolt would mean that if you charge your car at this high rate of speed on just and even irregular basis but O'casion Li it would cause the battery to degrade because of getting hot at a much higher rate of speed 2 to 4 Times faster then using a 100 kW charger to charge your car on a semi regular basis.

      about 3 months ago
    • yakyakyak69
      yakyakyak69

      Rapidly pulsing the current should also reduce dendrite formation.

      about 3 months ago
    • thelondonbroiler
      thelondonbroiler

      I believe they would have already been acquired by another entity if the technology works as described. Happy to be wrong in this case.

      about 3 months ago
    • David Drake
      David Drake

      Like I suggested to Mary Bara, The Bolt with its efficiency could do 350 miles easy with a 75 Kwhr battery. Does anyone know if the Bolts use any of the Tech from the EV-1? I have heard that with modern Lithium Ion batteries the EV-1 has a range of around 600 miles. A great experiment with the one I hear Jay Leno has. It is a shame that GM ultimately designed the Bolt to be a compliance vehicle, even as good as it is,( I now have 94,000 miles on mine-recently took on a Mercedes on a long stretch with no other traffic. At the end, even though he won, we shook hands and he said hey! That is some car!

      about 3 months ago
    • News Coulomb
      News Coulomb In reply to David Drake

      The Bolt EV and EV-1 don't really share much in common, and other than aerodynamics, the Bolt EV is a much more efficient vehicle. If the EV-1 just had the Bolt EV's battery, the two cars would likely have similar range. If the EV-1 also had the Bolt EV's motor, it would likely have an EPA rated range of about 300 miles.

      about 3 months ago
    • David Drives Electric
      David Drives Electric

      I have heard about this story two months ago. I highly doubt it's legit. No real demo other than a computer screen showing a graphic animation. I just can't see how a different charge pattern can magically make cells magnitudes better. I remember similar claims were hyped back when NiCD and NiMH cells were common. They had a smart pulsing charge method with very short bursts of discharging in between. Those were supposed to help the chemistry in the cells and accept a higher charge rate. Turned out it was not of any advantage over other charging methods. I'm sure every Lithium cell manufacturer has done extensive experimenting with all kinds of charging methods to get a faster charge rate and a better life time. I think GBatteries is just a hype to get funding. Yes we all want this to be true and everyone is eager to bet on the company that achieves a major breakthrough in battery technology. It would be the equivalent to winning the lottery 10 times. But I think there is too much wishful thinking. I hope these guys will prove me wrong, but I seriously doubt it.

      about 3 months ago
    • Jose Vargas
      Jose Vargas

      I guess that always there is someone trying out there to tackle the problems we fase currently on a technology and it always fansinats me that we found breakthrous everywhere. Today we have in our minds that this or that are impossible things and we build our products with that in mind and tomorrow our vails are fallen and we see that there is a clear path to make the impossible happens. I'm always thrilled about that fact with science and tech. I hope these pulse tehcnology is more than an advertising or desire and is close to a reality!

      about 3 months ago
    • Jose Vargas
      Jose Vargas

      Great video Eric. I like the discussions you choose to speak about in this side plug site chats. But I'll like you to make them more visualy appealing. Like shots from diferent points of view or inserts of images ilustrating what you are talking or showing the source of hte information. Just little variations on what it's seen on camera.

      about 3 months ago
    • Nambians
      Nambians

      Freaking awesome! Hopefully this technology will make it into production cars within the next few model years

      about 3 months ago
    • IMHO
      IMHO

      While it sounds good, it seems like snake oil. The simple acid test is why haven’t they been able to sell it to Apple, Oppo, or anyone else that would love to advertise 10 minute charging with extended cycle life?

      While it seems like a great idea to push hard, then relax, then push hard again, somewhat like getting on a crowded subway train, I’ll bet there are some “complications” that they are ignoring. It’s like these quacks with graphene batteries showing how fast they charge and that they can power something for 30 seconds immediately after charging, but don’t go into the part able rapid self discharge and low energy density.

      So if they pulse a cell until it reaches 4.2v (or higher), then let it relax and give time for the surface charge to drop, and for the ions to get out of gridlock, and then send a high current again until the cells are at 4.2v again, and keep repeating, will it really charge fastest and under less degradation than just using the same average current?

      about 3 months ago
    • Chester Nimitz
      Chester Nimitz

      The current Motor Trend talks about this.

      about 3 months ago
    • Adithya Ramachandran
      Adithya Ramachandran

      How will battery longevity be impacted ? From personal experience I know that pushing through more energy leads to quicker charging, but it also leads to overheating and faster degredation of cells. I think consistent 100-150kW charging is what most vehicles should use, and they should maintain their Max rate between 20-80 percent SOC.

      about 3 months ago
    • News Coulomb
      News Coulomb In reply to Adithya Ramachandran

      They claim that the battery degradation is actually reduced over typical DCFC. It seems that they are claiming that traditional constant-current, constant-voltage charging rules don't apply.

      about 3 months ago
    • M Carter
      M Carter

      In all the years they have been around, has a single vehicle been charged with their technology? Their website doesn't show a demo video; can their background in cell phone batteries scale to BEVs? I want to believe ...

      about 3 months ago
    • News Coulomb
      News Coulomb In reply to M Carter

      A number of important innovations are the result of blending two existing technologies. So far, advanced computers and AI haven't been leveraged to control battery charging on a call level.

      In theory, this is sound. Whether it actually works is another story.

      about 3 months ago
    • Chris Bates
      Chris Bates

      Check it out. He did this in a leaf no a Bolt. https://www.facebook.com/TheNegativeCarbonUSRoadTrip/photos/a.1687134361516629/2439046266325431?type=3&sfns=mo

      about 3 months ago
    • Erik Stephens
      Erik Stephens

      I too hope this is a valid technology that is simple to implement. Of note the 350KW stations being installed are rated at 950 - 1000 VDC. Which are voltages that are likely far above what the Bolt EV could ever use (unless the pulsation involves pushing far higher voltage than what a cell would normally take). Given existing infrastructure I'm guessing that would still limit the Bolt EV to about 150KW which is still great.

      about 3 months ago
    • usaverageguy
      usaverageguy

      I want this to work, the same way I want the newest magic weight loss pill to work. But I am rather confident, the pill is just a placebo. And this miracle charger tech is just smoke and mirrors. But I would never discourage someone from proving me wrong.

      about 3 months ago
    • Bruce Kackman
      Bruce Kackman

      Interesting concept. That would be a game changer.

      Thanks for continuing to scour the literature for these gems of info.

      about 3 months ago
    • John Smith
      John Smith

      If true that would be a start. They still need to get the prices down to around 18K to 20K and the distances up to 500 mile summer and winter before these vehicles are practical.

      about 3 months ago
    • John Smith
      John Smith In reply to John Smith

      a chick magnet!? Now that is a new one for reasons to pay an extra 20k on average for a vehicle.

      about 3 months ago
    • David Drake
      David Drake In reply to John Smith

      News Coulomb I agree. Give me a better seat!!!!

      about 3 months ago
    • David Drake
      David Drake In reply to John Smith

      John Smith No I think 400
      Actual high speed miles would be the tipping point. My now retired Acura 3.2 TL had a range of about 400 miles, and even picky me would accept that. Except for these damn seats, I am wonderfully satisfied with the Bolt so far and I have (except for the driver seat-did I mention the seat?) 94,000 miles of hard ridin, fast chargin under my belt ( or butt as the case may be ha ha oooh) plus I have found out as a ride-share driver, it is a chick magnet!!

      about 3 months ago
    • John Smith
      John Smith In reply to John Smith

      Dennis Lyon, I drive a corolla 6 speed manual shift, not a hybrid, and I drive for MPG and no the700 miles is not 35 mph. I can do it at highway speeds. I have gotten over 50 MPG since the vehicle was new. I keep all records of fill ups and miles driven computed at the pump not by the vehicle computer. I also only use pure gas, no ethanol which gives me about 10% more mpg over ethanol. It takes about 20 years just to break even in an EV when compared to a comparable sized gas model.

      about 3 months ago
    • Dennis Lyon
      Dennis Lyon In reply to John Smith

      John Smith - you don’t state what you drive, but at $18-20k, we’re likely looking at about 13 gallons into 700 miles - which converts to 54 mpg. This mpg level takes hybrid technology (or an impractical 35 mph highway speed with a purely ICE car) to deliver that kind of economy. I’m doubtful a hybrid can be purchased at $18-20k, unless it’s used. And I’m not traveling in a gas powered car for hours on end at 35 mph just to go 700 miles on a tank of fuel. My time is more valuable than being that practical. But let’s assume we did - did you know that a Chevy Bolt EV, when driven at 35 mph, can go well over 300 miles on less than $10 of fuel? That’s way less cost than even the 700 mile car you cite can do. The EV road tax for a Bolt EV in my state costs about 2/3 of what I’d be paying when driving an equivalent gas powered car - even more EV savings.

      about 3 months ago
    • Gerrit Govaerts
      Gerrit Govaerts

      If it's pulsed , it is reaching way higher C rates than 6 . Quite unbelieveable

      about 3 months ago
    • Gerrit Govaerts
      Gerrit Govaerts In reply to Gerrit Govaerts

      @News Coulomb Yep , for a fact , you can discharge a 2170 cell at 6 C for a minute , 10 C for 10 secs . Is that enough to charge to 100% in 10 minutes assuming symmetry between charging and discharging capability ?

      about 3 months ago
    • News Coulomb
      News Coulomb In reply to Gerrit Govaerts

      Yes, I was referring to the average overall rate, but to your point, that could be as high as 12 C (or more, considering they stated that in some cases the cells would be discharged).

      Some have noted that the Bolt EV's regenerative braking feeds 70 kW back into the battery (which exceeds the 1 C rating); however, that is allowable due to the short duration.

      about 3 months ago