It's Panasonic's first camera body explicitly configured for stills shooters. Does the Micro Four Thirds cliché, Olympus for stills, Panasonic for video still apply? Let's find put....
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Comments

    • Tattoo Billy Von
      Tattoo Billy Von

      The shutter button is great being so sensitive. At first yes , but once you get the hang, you’ll find other shutter release hard and stiff.

      about 19 hours ago
    • David Thorpe
      David Thorpe In reply to Tattoo Billy Von

      I still find it a bit over-sensitive but I know that many photographers prefer it that way. I have got used to it, though, as you say.

      about 9 hours ago
    • Ricardo Gomez
      Ricardo Gomez

      I finally bought a G9 about 5 weeks ago and I absolutely love it! The more I keep learning about it's capabilities, the more it wows me. When I get my blog up and running, I'll do an in-depth review. For now, it's a 100% professional, stills camera for use in just about any, commercial genre. As you mentioned, it's probably not the best for sports and darker venues.

      It's going to be tough to top this. I agree with the backlit buttons being a nicety. Also, I would much rather trade that micro-USB connector for a USB-C one. 

      So if these two things are included on the next model, what's next? A new sensor that improves the color depth, dynamic range and AF? I mean, that would be nice for sure. But for now, I see lots of great work and art being done with my G9!

      about 17 days ago
    • Ricardo Gomez
      Ricardo Gomez In reply to Ricardo Gomez

      David Thorpe I don't have as much history with Panasonic. But I agree. It's like Porsche. After 50 years, Porsche still looks and feels like a Porsche with the right updates.

      about 15 days ago
    • David Thorpe
      David Thorpe In reply to Ricardo Gomez

      @Ricardo Gomez Panasonic really started to get camera design right with the GH3 and they've been wise enough not to alter it tom much since. Sometimes the best upgrade is simply not to spoil what you already have. :-)

      about 16 days ago
    • Ricardo Gomez
      Ricardo Gomez In reply to Ricardo Gomez

      David Thorpe I love using it. Even when I go out for street photography, and I think about grabbing my smaller, lighter and more hipster GX8, I still pick up the G9. I'm sure some of that is the 'new toy' feeling of the G9. But I can't deny how fantastic the ergonomics and button placement are. It's important. Before moving to NY, I had to sell one of my cameras. I sold my superior Canon 5D MKII in favor of my Canon 50D. Just because I love using my 50D so much. And it shows in the pics....

      about 17 days ago
    • David Thorpe
      David Thorpe In reply to Ricardo Gomez

      Good to hear that, Ricardo. As you say, there are improvements that could be made but the G9 as it is remains one of the best, if not the best cameras I've ever used.

      about 17 days ago
    • kM Kelin
      kM Kelin

      Great review, thanks. I don't know why so many reviewers say that the shutter release is too sensitive, I find it perfect, smooth and responsive (and I am oldish and clumsy). You get used to it's responsiveness after the first few uses.

      about 1 month ago
    • David Thorpe
      David Thorpe In reply to kM Kelin

      I'm used to it now but I'd still like it a little less sensitive, personally. Having said that, Panasonic researched the G9 Thoroughly so the test users must have approved. Glad you liked the review.

      about 1 month ago
    • Jose Miguel Vicencio
      Jose Miguel Vicencio

      From a Panasonic, Fender and Brompton fan (even maybe Rush, or French), I couldn't be happier here

      about 3 months ago
    • David Thorpe
      David Thorpe In reply to Jose Miguel Vicencio

      Nice to hear from a man with such refined and sophisticated tastes, Jose :-)

      about 3 months ago
    • Jose Miguel Vicencio
      Jose Miguel Vicencio

      The amount of information squeezed into each sentence had me rwd and rwd... Great review! This equals 10 reviews from other Utube channels

      about 3 months ago
    • David Thorpe
      David Thorpe In reply to Jose Miguel Vicencio

      Nice of you to say so, Jose, thank you.

      about 3 months ago
    • Tattoo Billy Von
      Tattoo Billy Von

      Really enjoy my G9

      about 4 months ago
    • David Thorpe
      David Thorpe In reply to Tattoo Billy Von

      I'm not surprised - I enjoy mine too :-)

      about 3 months ago
    • Guarim1000
      Guarim1000

      David since I became interested and got my G80 I take into account your analyzes. I bought two panasonic lenses as well. Always a pleasure to enjoy this voice. For the first time, I must confess, I think of selling my Nikon D7200. By 20 mp I am taking into account the Panasonic G9 as an excellent option for my work with stills. I have doubts regarding its performance in low light. What do you think. Please, sorry for the long text

      about 4 months ago
    • Guarim1000
      Guarim1000 In reply to Guarim1000

      @David Thorpe Yes, the use of lenses and the portability of the equipment. I think Panasonic is two steps up technologically. Thanks again for your attention on the answer.

      about 4 months ago
    • David Thorpe
      David Thorpe In reply to Guarim1000

      The 20Mp sensor is nice in that you get the extra pixels without any extra noise. On the other hand, I'd expect image quality to be similar to your Nikon but not better. The big advantage would be in using the same lenses across both your cameras.

      about 4 months ago
    • Greg Wallace
      Greg Wallace

      According to a Panasonic ambassador, the light shutter button was designed that way. So every camera is the same.

      about 5 months ago
    • David Thorpe
      David Thorpe In reply to Greg Wallace

      Yes, I believe so. Much too light in my opinion but I expect their are others who like it.

      about 5 months ago
    • Marcos Codas
      Marcos Codas

      Hi, David! Ages ago, your review was a huge part of why I bought my GX85. Today, I bought a G9, as I've started to get more serious paid work and needed the extra insurance afforded by the dual memory card slots and weather sealing.

      I am really happy to see you coupled the G9 here with the Olympus 12-40 2.8. That's what I'll do, and I was wondering if you could give me your thoughts on how they perform together (G9 and 12-40 2.8).

      Particularly, in terms of auto focus performance, and ergonomics.

      I'll get the camera in about two weeks, but any help in the meantime is appreciated.

      Thank you as always for your fantastic content.

      about 6 months ago
    • TITAOSTEIN
      TITAOSTEIN In reply to Marcos Codas

      David Thorpe hi David, which is the best in your opinion with the G9? 12-40 or 12-35? Why? Thank you

      about 1 month ago
    • Marcos Codas
      Marcos Codas In reply to Marcos Codas

      @David Thorpe thank you SO MUCH for the thorough reply! I did not know that the G9 was able to make use of the Fn button on the 12-40! Since it does work on my GX85, I wouldn't have tried it on the G9!

      Good to know that the auto focus performance is on par with Panny lenses.

      It all looks like it'll be a good pairing!

      about 6 months ago
    • David Thorpe
      David Thorpe In reply to Marcos Codas

      You'll love the G9, I'm sure, Marcos. The auto focus with the Olympus lens is just as fast as any Panasonic lens and they make an ideal combination, suiting one another in weight and size. The Olympus 12-40 is such a good performer - I sold my Olympus 12mm f/2 after using the zoom for a bit as the zoom was sharper and, of course, so much more versatile.

      I like the manual focus collar, so easy just to pull back the focus ring and there's a depth of field scale too. Panasonic have, usefully, incorporated a control for the on lens Fn button, I use to for the default focus operation but there are plenty of other options. It does show that Panasonic don't just cater for their own brand, which I like. Especially, though, I like the quality build of both items. You get the feeling that you have got what you paid for.

      about 6 months ago
    • Asoldier1844
      Asoldier1844

      The G9 or the Olympus Mk 2?

      about 6 months ago
    • Asoldier1844
      Asoldier1844 In reply to Asoldier1844

      David Thorpe, thank you for your quick reply. I appreciate your videos :)

      about 6 months ago
    • David Thorpe
      David Thorpe In reply to Asoldier1844

      It's a toss up really. I prefer the Panasonic because the menu system is so much better and you can store camera settings as well as program the Custom settings. On the other hand, the Olympus is a bit better for follow focus. But the G9's joystick is excellent and the top LCD very useful. Plus you can both power and charge the camera via the USB 3 plug. And a much bigger, brighter EVF. On the other hand, the Olympus is a bit smaller and has retro=styling. Or the G9 is £250 cheaper in the UK anyway. That's probably do it for me!

      about 6 months ago
    • Rob J
      Rob J

      How was it using Olympus lenses on the G9? I am tempted to buy the EM1 Mk2 because I already have Olympus lenses.

      about 7 months ago
    • David Thorpe
      David Thorpe In reply to Rob J

      I use Olympus or Panasonic lenses without thinking about it. The focusing is the same on both and though Panasonic's Depth from Defocus doesn't work with Olympus lenses, you'd never know under normal circumstances. The difference is that with an Olympus lens on Panasonic , in fast sequences initial lock-on is a little slower. Once locked on, little difference. Also, if you have an Olympus lens with stabilization built in it won't work with the G9. But the camera itself has around 5 stops so it hardly matters.

      about 7 months ago
    • nerd Mike
      nerd Mike

      My definitive m43 camera would be. I like and prefer top lcd.. so at the moment upgraded from G7 to G85, HAPPY but G9 better :)

      about 8 months ago
    • nerd Mike
      nerd Mike In reply to nerd Mike

      @David Thorpe upgraded too g80 from g7, nice 😊

      about 8 months ago
    • David Thorpe
      David Thorpe In reply to nerd Mike

      The G9 is great, but the G85 is a great camera, too.

      about 8 months ago
    • 2yoyodog
      2yoyodog

      ...apart from frequently being unintelligible..(garbled speech)..an informative//interesting review. thanks

      about 8 months ago
    • Kennynva
      Kennynva

      Nice video...and thanks for it.................I cant help but think about 'children of the sun" by Billy Thorpe.....back in the day.......1979 when I see your last name.....have a good day...

      about 8 months ago
    • David Thorpe
      David Thorpe In reply to Kennynva

      Thanks, Kennynva. He's not a relative, though given the name we are both probably descendants of a great Viking warrior :-)

      about 8 months ago
    • Robin Mordasiewicz
      Robin Mordasiewicz

      Do you know if the G9 will do continuous autofocus when the camera is connected to an external HDMI device, while not recording to internal memory. I ask because the G85 will only do continuous autofocus while it is recording to internal memory, which makes external capture through HDMI impossible, however the GH5 will do continuous autofocus without having to record internally, which makes it good for externally connected HDMI capture.
      Does the G9 behave like the GH5 or the G85 for continuous autofocus while not recording internally, and while connected to an external HDMI output ?

      about 8 months ago
    • David Thorpe
      David Thorpe In reply to Robin Mordasiewicz

      @Robin Mordasiewicz I do -it is https://amzn.to/2RwxjO1 Thanks!

      about 8 months ago
    • Robin Mordasiewicz
      Robin Mordasiewicz In reply to Robin Mordasiewicz

      David Thorpe very much thanks. I guess I only have one thing to do now. Do you have an affiliate link for the G9 ?

      about 8 months ago
    • David Thorpe
      David Thorpe In reply to Robin Mordasiewicz

      @Robin Mordasiewicz Yes, to reiterate and confirm, if I simply plug the G9 into my monitor's HDMI input with the camera in C-AF mode, it will autofocus as I move it around. It applies with stills too.

      about 8 months ago
    • Robin Mordasiewicz
      Robin Mordasiewicz In reply to Robin Mordasiewicz

      David Thorpe yes. This answers the question. I can send output to an external HDMI device for unlimited capture without having to record internally. Internal recording stops after 10 minutes.
      So if you are correct in saying that without pressing the record button on the G9, and while connected to an external HDMI device then continuous autofocus is still working perfectly fine.
      That means I can record with atomos ninja or stream or playback on any HDMI device independently of internal recording limitations.
      Thanks very much. So this means the G9 behaves like the GH5, and not the G85. (G85 requires the device to internal record for autofocus to work)

      One more question. Does the autofocus also work while on a tripod where you move in/out forward/back ?
      I ask because the G85 will only do “Quick Autofocus” when hand held because it’s activated by the gyro sensing a change in movement, thus continuous autofocus in the G85 only works when handheld.

      about 8 months ago
    • David Thorpe
      David Thorpe In reply to Robin Mordasiewicz

      @Robin Mordasiewicz I hope I'm following you here! With the G9 plugged into the HDMI port of my Benq 2700PT monitor (giving a stunning image) autofocus takes place both while monitoring only or recording and monitoring. I hope that answers your question.

      I've learnt a bit from this, thanks. One notable thing is how solidly effective the AF is with video, a massive improvement on previous iterations of the system. In room light it goes from object to object with no hunting at all.

      about 8 months ago
    • Rob P
      Rob P

      Yes!!! You nailed it towards the end of the video about putting phase detection in their cameras. Panasonic is too stubborn and if Olympus would add phase detection in their next EM5, it could take away some of Panasonic's sales for still photography. You really made it easy for me and my upgrade decision for 2019 with the EM1.

      about 8 months ago
    • David Thorpe
      David Thorpe In reply to Rob P

      I try to put the cameras I review in to some wider perspective than 'better' or 'worse' since there isn't a bad camera in the entire Micro Four Thirds lineup. There are cameras mores suited to some photographers than others, however and that's what I try to highlight. Nice to know that it has been useful to you.

      about 8 months ago
    • Adam Brener
      Adam Brener

      Fantastic review! Informative and relevant. Great journalistic style. I have a question about the G9 which you didn't address in your review. Is there a flash you prefer and can recommend for use on this camera? Thanks!

      about 9 months ago
    • David Thorpe
      David Thorpe In reply to Adam Brener

      Thanks very much, Adam! For the stuff I do, I rarely use flash and all I have is a Mecablitz 15 MS-1 - review https://youtu.be/aUcqJ8hzUI0 . I've been a lifelong user of Mecablitz flashes and if I were buying one, I'd look at those first, probably the 52 AF-1 which does everything you might want in terms of master/ slave etc for Micro Four Thirds cameras.

      about 9 months ago
    • FRST2012
      FRST2012

      Another great review.
      A tough choice between this and the EM1 Mkii. Currently using a G80 and looking for something that will be a great alrounder for portraits, motorsport and football. Pros and cons with both systems. Mostly have Olympus glass but even that doesn’t swing the fulcrum as Panasonic also uses it well and currently a good few hundred pounds cheaper.

      about 9 months ago
    • David Thorpe
      David Thorpe In reply to FRST2012

      Glad you liked the review. It's almost a toss of the coin. I much prefer the ergonomics and menu system of the Panasonic but if I used a camera for sports a lot, I'd incline to the Olympus. It's not head and shoulders above the G9 but it does have the edge. As an all rounder, the Panasonic...what can I say, it is the first camera I pick up by instinct because, with time taken to set it up to your preferences, it is just so damned easy to use.

      about 9 months ago
    • Harold6643
      Harold6643

      Another informative & concise review. There is one thing that I find confusing in the video at 8.33 . You mentioned the agressive noise reduction on the jpeg in camera by default. So you said you set the noise reduction at the minimum but the caption in the video at the same moment reads : jpeg directly from RAW , so could you please let us know which is which . Is there way to turn down the noise resolution for the in-camera jpegs other than saving a new file jpeg file from the RAW ? Thank you for clarifying this point :)

      about 9 months ago
    • David Thorpe
      David Thorpe In reply to Harold6643

      Happy to do so - In the Rec menu, you'll find Photo Style. I leave it set to standard but there are many choices there. Each choice has a some sliders underneath that enable you to set the JPG output, colours, Saturation etc. how you want. One of them is NR, Noise Reduction. You can set it to your taste there. I switch it to -5 since I prefer to retain detail and a bit of noise doesn't upset me too much. That's purely a personal preference, of course but it is good to have the choice.

      about 9 months ago
    • Lee Innes
      Lee Innes

      Hi David. Great review & channel, allways entertaining & informative. Can I ask why you prefer the G9 over the Olympus E-M1 Mkll (if you do of course)? I am considering purchasing my first camera, possibly G80 & hope you could offer lens recomemdations?. I am travelling overseas for 3 months next year and would like to take 2 or 3 lenses. My interests are landscape, architecture, cityscape (at night) & street. Thre are so many lenses to chhose from it's all very confusing! :)

      about 9 months ago
    • Marko
      Marko

      I bought my G9 recently. It truly is an incredible tool. David’s book on the menu has been a great help and worth every penny. Thank you David.

      about 9 months ago
    • David Thorpe
      David Thorpe In reply to Marko

      It's a great camera - and I'm glad you found the book helpful. Thanks!

      about 9 months ago
    • Marc
      Marc

      In french : "Plus ça change, plus c'est la même chose" (Marc, from Paris) ;-) Thanks for sharing. I just bought a G9 to upgrade my GX8 and I really appreciate the accessibility to the several fonctions, the ergonomics and handling. The AF joystick combine with the Fn1 button is a must. And "Lumix" website gives a lot of information to set it up properly. It changes me from my Sony A7RIII who was a chinese puzzle-like.

      about 9 months ago
    • David Thorpe
      David Thorpe In reply to Marc

      The G9 is a highly complex camera and Panasonic have done a very good job in making its operation as straightforward as they have. For me, like you, the user friendliness of the camera is one of its great attractions. By the way, just because you're French doesn't mean you speak French better than me :-) However, I've consulted with the Academie Francaise and they tell me you are correct so I'll accept your correction - just this once, mind.

      about 9 months ago
    • Christopher Cox
      Christopher Cox

      Are you seeing the difference in the raw files coming from the G9 to the G85? I don't mean in terms of dynamic range or resolution. The difference I'm seeing between my G85 and GH5 is how plyable the raw images are. With the GH5 I can bring down highlights, but with the G85 raw highlights seem baked in like as if it's partly cooked.

      about 10 months ago
    • David Thorpe
      David Thorpe In reply to Christopher Cox

      I haven't directly compared the raw files but the GH5 does have a different and more recent sensor than the G85 so that's probably it. Sesnor development is on a plateau at the moment but the incremental changes made do add up. It's funny for anyone used to film cameras - I find any exposure within a couple of stops of "correct" can be turned up or down and give perfect results. Try that with Kodachrome 32 with about a half stop margin from perfect to unusable!

      about 10 months ago
    • Lyndon Smith
      Lyndon Smith

      Backface Super. Nice! Oh and the G9 is nice too 😀

      about 10 months ago
    • hardmf247
      hardmf247

      You say you can have x, x and FPS and with live view you can have y FPS....isn’t the evf always in live view?

      about 10 months ago
    • David Thorpe
      David Thorpe In reply to hardmf247

      No, in some sequence modes you are viewing the last frame shot, not the live subject. If you have a fast moving subject, by the time the live view is resumed it can have moved enough to make 'panning', that is following the subject, a hit and miss affair.


      An exaggerated form of that is shooting single stills with image review set to, say 3 seconds. Up to the moment you press the shutter you are in live view. For the 3 following seconds after you are seeing the image you just shot with live view only resuming after that.That is an option, of course, whereas the effect is certain sequence modes is hard baked in.

      about 10 months ago
    • Dan Oh
      Dan Oh

      Hi David, Tony Northrup has YouTube on "Micro Four-Thirds is DEAD" yesterday. As a G9 and GH5 owner and Wildlife enthusiast I understand his points from financial / business point of view. My thought is Organic sensor will "save" M43 format. Any thoughts?

      about 10 months ago
    • David Thorpe
      David Thorpe In reply to Dan Oh

      I think the main attraction of the Micro Four Thirds system is as strong as ever, the size of the equipment. While I agree that the bulk of FF lenses will come down, it can never match the compactness and low weight of Micro Four Thirds. IQ factors to me are secondary, in that the Micro Four Thirds sensor yields perfectly acceptable quality already and, anyway, any improvements in Micro Four Thirds sensors will be applicable to FF too. However, photographers are heavily influenced by out and out IQ - ridiculously so, in my book - and the new mirrorless cameras will certainly prove popular. The superb Sony A7 series has never affected Micro Four Thirds sales much, though. But asking me is probably pointless - I'm the guy who thought the GM1 and GM5 would be big sellers :-(

      about 10 months ago
    • jimbo33
      jimbo33

      Another fine review, thank you!

      about 10 months ago
    • David Thorpe
      David Thorpe In reply to jimbo33

      Thank you, sir!

      about 10 months ago
    • Chris Williams
      Chris Williams

      Good review as ever - I’ve just ordered one. One thing I would take issue with however is the high res mode comment. I’m not sure there’s any more call on the lens in terms of resolution, since each capture still only needs to resolve 20mp. Additional resolution is achieved via the combination of each sample. I think the fact it doesn’t resolve quite as much as you’d expect is a limitation of the processing and the inherent properties of the Bayer array, so that at each photosite you benefit from sampling true colour rather than R, G or B. In that way you’ll get more colour depth and dynamic range out of your subject (and less noise), but that won’t translate into genuinely four times the resolution in an absolute sense. I may be wrong, but I think it has little or nothing to do with limitations of the resolving power of the lens.

      about 11 months ago
    • David Thorpe
      David Thorpe In reply to Chris Williams

      @Chris Williamsinterestingly, that quote, the camera never lies, actually implies the opposite. The full quote, paraphrased, says that the camera cannot lie but the Photographer, just as much as the painter, can.

      about 11 months ago
    • Chris Williams
      Chris Williams In reply to Chris Williams

      David Thorpe
      Yes of course, but to illustrate the attitude compare and contrast ‘the mind plays tricks on us’ with ‘the camera never lies’. We’ve come to regard the still image (not always rightly) as an accurate representation of an event, where we don’t entirely trust memory (especially other people’s!) That may flip...

      about 11 months ago
    • David Thorpe
      David Thorpe In reply to Chris Williams

      What is particularly interesting is touched on when you say 'we can no longer be sure what level of detail is being captured against what is being manufactured by the camera'. It applies just as aptly if you substitute 'brain' for 'camera'. I went to a Gresham lecture a couple of years ago on the nature of perception. It seems about 5% of what we see is taken from the rather limited (though versatile) acuity of our eyes and the other 95% added in by the brain's acquired experience. Thus our final image is based on a shifting sand interpreted through more shifting sand. Again, as you say, who cares provided they are getting stunning imagery. Provided it's not medical photography, of course.

      about 11 months ago
    • Chris Williams
      Chris Williams In reply to Chris Williams

      David Thorpe
      Yes there’s no halting algorithms that will do far more than a bit of noise reduction/sharpening/demosaicing - the sort of things we take for granted in digital imaging. We will come to a point when we can no longer be sure what level of detail is being captured against what is ‘manufactured’ by the camera. It does throw up a lot of questions. Perhaps there’ll be a separate category of forensic photography all about accurate representation. I suspect most people won’t care if they’re getting stunning imagery from their tiny smart devices. We’re old fogeys now, init?⌛️

      about 11 months ago
    • David Thorpe
      David Thorpe In reply to Chris Williams

      When I bought my first Micro Four Thirds camera, I thought how good it would be if the camera could use the contrast information as it quickly racks in and out and apply a blur factor (which you would choose) related to the distance from the point of focus. It's be perfectly easy to apply more to the forward area than the back area. That way you could shoot at, say, f/5.6 to get adequate depth of field while blurring the background to taste. I did contact Panasonic but got no reply (what's new?). It shouldn't be too hard to simulate accurate out of focus characteristics for a lens. I know a lot of photographers would object to this but that argument was lost for me when my chief photographer showed me how to move a football to a better position while printing the weekend sports output from 9 photographers. That was more than 50 years ago!

      about 11 months ago
    • MrPieroL
      MrPieroL

      Your reviews are a pleasure to see and hear. Lots of information but also entertaining! Great!

      I bought the G80 (G81 in Germany) last year and I really like it's IQ and handling. BUT I found myself having some issues with ergonomics and functions, most of them you pointed out in your reviews. Panasonic seemed to have addressed all of them with the G9 which is cool but someway expensive...

      - Changing Focus point or changing the point size via the direction buttons or via other button combinations is quirky -> G9 has a joystick!
      - I have issues with the grip of the G80, my pinkie finger can not grasp the camera body so it feels a bit insecure. -> G9 is slightly higher and fits PERFECTLY in my hand.
      - I always get confused by the buttons on the right side, I want to change settings via Q.menu but I pressed DISP or Playback... ISO, WB? Are they at the top or right or left? I'm constantly pressing the wrong buttons. -> On the G9 there are less buttons and ISO, WB, Exp.Comp are on the top.
      - When I want to check what settings I dialed in, I look through the Viewfinder which is sometimes annoying and a little too slow. But I don't want to flip the screen out because the battery will get drained earlier. -> G9 has a LCD on top with the main settings. cool.
      - G80 has the tripod mount a little too close to the lens mount so I am not confident that the camera with a plate attached sits stable enough with my 100-300 mm on the tripod... -> G9 has the mount more in the center so a bigger plate will fit better.
      - Some settings are only reached via menu which can be tedious -> G9 has My Menu!
      - G80 front dial is sometimes a bit too stiff -> G9 has the front dial on different axis and is easier to turn I think.
      - G9 has USB-charging! With the G80 I sometimes found myself stuck with batteries drowned on a very long day shooting (also video), a power bank and USB charging could have helped...
      - G9 has better (video and continuous) autofocus which can be sluggish on the G80 sometimes. I find myself photographing birds and even bats in flight, so the G80 isn't the best tool for it I think.

      But are these improvements worth a doubled price tag? Will I take the G9 with me more often than the G80? I don't think so because it's even bigger and heavier... and will I get better pictures? *sigh*

      about 11 months ago
    • Alejandro Sikaffy
      Alejandro Sikaffy

      thanks David, great review .... I have as a hobby birding and I use the Nikon D500 with the Sigma Sport 150-600mm and I get very good results, the question is: can the G9 with the 100-400mm give me similar results? thanks in advance for your response

      about 11 months ago
    • David Thorpe
      David Thorpe In reply to Alejandro Sikaffy

      Thanks, Alejandro! It depends on what your final output is intended to be. For prints up to about 2 feet across or screens up to 4,000 px across, no appreciable difference. I saw an interesting YouTube video where a London professional gives images from Micro Four Thirds and his FF Nikon to a printing lab and asks the printer afterwards to judge from the prints which was which. He couldn't tell at all.

      In low light, the APS-C sensor will be about 1 stop better, so it's really a balance between that one stop against the smaller, handier camera. The lower noise will make little difference up to 1600 or even 3200 ISO, however.

      about 11 months ago