This is my method to doing a t-splice (splicing a new wire into an existing wire) without solder. All you need are the wires you want to splice and some quality electrical tape or even better, some heat shrink tubing. Yes, it is better to solder but this method It works great and is strong if you don't have solder. I claim to be no expert electrician, your mileage may vary as well as opinions. Hope this helps someone.

You can get a nice hook set here for cheap:
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Here's the wire stripper that I use:
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*** Standard disclaimers apply. I assume no responsibility for any damage to watching my videos. Please be careful - the consequences of a mistake or improper install could be disastrous ***

Comments

    • Thinking Out Loud
      Thinking Out Loud

      1st I agree that solder is the best. However, to all you doubters what to you all suggest be done, say inside the cab of a brand new car when installing something like an amp and keeping the factory radio? I wouldn't really trust a soldering iron inside the cab of a car that close to other wires sensitive, equipment and the like, its far too great a fire hazard IMO. Maybe butt-connections, but then you decrease the strength of the signal going to the speaker you're tapping into... It really is one of the better options for that application.

      about 1 year ago
    • Lan Carter
      Lan Carter In reply to Thinking Out Loud

      +kd9bwi That was my first thought as well. However from what I understand, wire nuts are not recommended where there is a lot of vibration like there can be in automobiles.

      about 1 month ago
    • Joe Robinson
      Joe Robinson In reply to Thinking Out Loud

      NewsNowFRESNO your going a little overboard here don’t you thin?!?! This is a good video, your going to get a ton of moisture inside a vehicle and this is a common practice. I do agree that soldering is good practice especially outside the cab of ur vehicle because moisture is going to be high.

      about 2 months ago
    • carbonfiber492
      carbonfiber492 In reply to Thinking Out Loud

      So the correct (ie the way it’s taught by manufacturers) way of doing this is to use a solder connector it takes all of about 5 seconds and ends up with a nice clean strong insulated connection

      about 3 months ago
    • Marc Gumbert
      Marc Gumbert In reply to Thinking Out Loud

      Thinking Out Loud f

      about 6 months ago
    • Flatus Antiquitous
      Flatus Antiquitous In reply to Thinking Out Loud

      Dan Dallman - false. All automotive electrical connections are made mechanically with crimp type connectors. Solder makes the conductor brittle and will fail with vibration or flexure. For non-vibration installations soldering is fine.

      about 7 months ago
    • Lau Riv
      Lau Riv

      Hi, i have a question.
      Can i use a 14AWG wire and connect various 18AWG wires to it to give power to various lights?
      the 14AWG would carry current for 7 LED spots and the 18AWG would be used to bring the current from the 14AWG to LED Spots. Is this ok to do?

      about 6 days ago
    • Banjo Fett
      Banjo Fett

      Would this help me install a rear camera to the backup light cable of my truck?

      about 11 days ago
    • Jason's Garage
      Jason's Garage In reply to Banjo Fett

      I would think so. Be sure to waterproof the connection.

      about 11 days ago
    • Davor Jakupec
      Davor Jakupec

      Thank you! Great advice bro!

      about 28 days ago
    • Lau Riv
      Lau Riv

      Can i use a 4mm² wire running from my fusebox, then split it somehow into two or more 1,5mm² wires which will run to my lights? all of this would be 12V

      about 1 month ago
    • MGKROOK
      MGKROOK

      Send those t taps this way 😂

      about 2 months ago
    • William  Baker
      William Baker

      Mabea you should show us how to strip back 2" of insulation to splice in the head light you sell.

      about 2 months ago
    • Mark W1MBF
      Mark W1MBF

      A++ Nice Technique! I will be soldering my joints as well, but super!

      about 2 months ago
    • christph3118
      christph3118

      What about running a wire for led running lights for tow mirrors?

      about 2 months ago
    • Jesus My Savior
      Jesus My Savior

      I been doing it his way for over 42 years. I do this when times you cannot do a cut, twist and cap. I only used electrical tape. I never had anyone complain about a loose splice or a connection. (I figure most of the cars and trucks I had worked on went back to the scrap yard.) No crimp or solder is needed. Retired 42 year shop mechanic. jmho

      about 2 months ago
    • Aaron Gallagher
      Aaron Gallagher

      I agree that solder is inferior to crimping. I tore the wires out of a mazda 1991 b2600 truck in a junk yard to salvage the connectors and noticed that the mazda company crimped wires --for example the power wire that feeds the injectors and other acutators from a single wire (one wire split in 3 directions )

      about 2 months ago
    • Kevin Burkett
      Kevin Burkett

      Now we know what Best Buy NOT to have work done at.

      about 2 months ago
    • Ashter Egg
      Ashter Egg

      how the hell you gonna put heat shrink over a block connector as you are splicing into an existing wire

      about 2 months ago
    • Jason's Garage
      Jason's Garage In reply to Ashter Egg

      You can use something like self-fusing tape or liquid electrical tape. There may be a better way that a car audio expert can suggest.

      about 2 months ago
    • The300ZXGuru
      The300ZXGuru

      https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7Wh5gM8GM70

      about 3 months ago
    • Jason's Garage
      Jason's Garage In reply to The300ZXGuru

      https://youtu.be/n-efQKnLdCY

      about 3 months ago
    • trellend
      trellend

      Twist and tape always fails, it's just a matter of time.

      about 3 months ago
    • emma harrington
      emma harrington

      Now show me it done with two actual automotive gauge wires ...

      about 3 months ago
    • Jason Debler
      Jason Debler In reply to emma harrington

      +emma harrington Ah, OK...yes, it does take a bit more finesse and patience with smaller gauge wires. Glad it was helpful!

      about 3 months ago
    • emma harrington
      emma harrington In reply to emma harrington

      The difference is that smaller gauge wires have much less filaments to separate and therefore are much more difficult, some small multiplex wires can have about 4 filaments so you are basically dividing 2x2 so you need something like a dental pick. Don’t get me wrong, your method is sound and you educated me and I successfully used the method shown, but it was much harder than that to do on a bmw i3 fuse box loom. I tried a wire tap and a scotchlok which were both useless and your method saved the day! Thanks

      about 3 months ago
    • Jason's Garage
      Jason's Garage In reply to emma harrington

      I just used a couple of scrap wires I had laying around. What would you expect to be different?

      about 3 months ago
    • Spencer Maiers
      Spencer Maiers

      Great video with honest observations about opinions. The wire will break before it fails. Well done.

      about 4 months ago
    • Roger Whiting
      Roger Whiting

      Thank god you didn't use a crimp. I have been soldering and heat shrinking ever since I saw what weather did to crimps. In 40 years I havent seen a protected solder connection fail.

      about 4 months ago
    • greg0716
      greg0716

      Ure the man. Thanks!!

      about 4 months ago
    • Christoph Bouche-eh!
      Christoph Bouche-eh!

      I was watchimg thinking to my self that's how I do it except, ..(Thats when the my way Is better thing kicked in) I would use dual wall heat shrink and you'll never get it apart with out cutting it or machine power. And pow.. You mentioned it. I just happened across it at the hardware store one day and was blown away by how well it worked. Those are the best automatic strippers too. I put a tiny bit of pressure down on the left side when it's cutting the insulation and they tend to not slip off so much. Drove me nuts. Cheers on the video man. :)

      about 4 months ago
    • Jason's Garage
      Jason's Garage In reply to Christoph Bouche-eh!

      They are great strippers, aren't they? There is a little adjustment knob to increase or reduce the tension on the wire. But your way of doing it works most of the time as well.

      about 4 months ago
    • jeanne Yvannovinch
      jeanne Yvannovinch

      what if the wire is solid not stranded?

      about 4 months ago
    • Jason's Garage
      Jason's Garage In reply to jeanne Yvannovinch

      Good question. Are you referring to residential applications?

      about 4 months ago
    • seancarraher
      seancarraher

      The problem with this is that oem wire has very few strands. Very tough to do this on an 18 gauge oem wire.

      about 4 months ago
    • Jason's Garage
      Jason's Garage In reply to seancarraher

      Yes, that is a good point. It is easy with test wires of "whatever gauge I grabbed that was laying around" and on a workbench with plenty of room.

      about 4 months ago
    • Nickolas Orosz
      Nickolas Orosz

      Out of curiosity, where did you hear that Roseville has the best Install Bay? I’m an Autotech Lead (Head Installer) in PA, and can tell you I’ve never heard such a claim.

      about 4 months ago
    • Jason's Garage
      Jason's Garage In reply to Nickolas Orosz

      I don't recall exactly who made the statement, it might have been the Head Installer himself there at the Roseville, MI store when I would stop in and chat with him. This was at least 6-7 years ago. Heck, since I made this video, even my memory has gotten fuzzy on the details. I can't even recall his name any more, I am sorry to say. He was pretty cool and did some solid work for me. That's how I got to know him.
      Since you are the lead, what do you think of this splicing method? Is this how you do it in your shop?
      I suppose to be fair...I do not recall for sure if he stated that it is how HE did it or just how I could do it in my own garage.
      (I also didn't expect to get more than 100 views on this video when I threw it together. Thanks to all who have provided input, both positive and constructive criticism in the spirit of education and knowledge.)

      about 4 months ago
    • bruno burtoni
      bruno burtoni

      Great now its time to tap into ignition wire and grab a fire hydrant handy just in case.

      about 5 months ago
    • sexiewasd
      sexiewasd

      HAHAHAHAHA!!! LOL! I’ve seen it all, advocating twist and tape like it’s anything other than shoddy lazy hacks! I love YouTube for this!

      about 5 months ago
    • Jason's Garage
      Jason's Garage In reply to sexiewasd

      ​+sexiewasdThanks for the info! That seems to be what a lot of the more experienced people say. Yes, it will work, but is not optimal for all applications. When I made the video, it was mainly for the people who bought lights from me (I don't even run the business any more) to easily get them wired up if they didn't know how. In the proces, I learned a lot myself. Check out the other video I made about Solder-Seal connectors and tell me your thoughts on that.

      about 5 months ago
    • sexiewasd
      sexiewasd In reply to sexiewasd

      Jason's Garage Alright I’ve been a bit short and rude, and this technique is pretty close to being solid, so I’ll explain my position, you’ve probably earned that.

      A good splice needs three things; a strong mechanical connection which this has, a consistent molecular connection with electrical resistance and capacitance as close to that of the lowest resistance conductor used which this does not have, and insulation, both electrical and protection from corrosion which this could have so I won’t focus on it, some splices in other applications also need rf shielding but that doesn’t apply here.

      If this joint adds solder, adhesive heat shrink, and strain relief it would be a very good connection, it has mechanical strength in spades. It would last longer than a lot of the shoddy cold solder jobs I’ve had to find and replace over the years, and if properly sealed would last longer than the hard plastic covered crimp butt connectors that are waaaayyy too common in the auto industry, and no one seams to bother sealing (I won’t mention scotch-loks) The big problem with this is that it does not provide a molecular connection, or a consistent electrical connection at the joint even if it is insured that the wire strands remain in constant contact.

      Without a molecular bond between the wires, provided by either solder, or cold welding inside a GOOD crimp both the resistance and capacitance will vary quite a lot with the pressure applied between the strands of each wire. You can easily measure this with the ohms setting on your multimeter and flexing or pressing on this joint. This might be ok for a power or ground as the only effect would be some extra heat at the joint as long as the circuit has buffer capacity relative to the load (you’ve used large enough wire, and a small enough fuse) it probably won’t be a big deal, if you haven’t done those things it’s a fire hazard, and is a big deal.

      Where this really fails is for any measured circuit such as 5v reference sensors as the variability in resistance can greatly influence the value of the measurement. Try this on a mass airflow wire and see how well your car runs, or try your luck with the can bus, or an air bag squib, you’ll find out just how good this is, and I know at least half of the people who take this videos advice will just wrap this up in dollar store electrical tape. I know this because I fix things like this on a daily basis.

      about 5 months ago
    • Jason's Garage
      Jason's Garage In reply to sexiewasd

      ​+sexiewasd "Literally"? All of the research? I suppose that could be true if you pick an choose your sources without considering credibility.

      about 5 months ago
    • sexiewasd
      sexiewasd In reply to sexiewasd

      Jason's Garage Literally all of the research says this is a lazy hack, so not sure what your getting at?

      about 5 months ago
    • Jason's Garage
      Jason's Garage In reply to sexiewasd

      You might want to do a but more research before you laugh. See some of the more educated comments right here in this video.

      about 5 months ago
    • Traves McCabe
      Traves McCabe

      https://millennialdiyer.com/articles/motorcycles/electrical-repair-crimp-or-solder/

      about 5 months ago
    • Jason's Garage
      Jason's Garage In reply to Traves McCabe

      That's a pretty good site, thanks for linking to it!

      about 5 months ago
    • Charlie Tate
      Charlie Tate

      This honestly is a fine way to do it, no reason of using solder for car audio at all. The better way would have been to crimp it with a non insulated butt connector, and then using heatshrink tubing or starbrite's liquid electrical tape.

      about 5 months ago
    • Viet Cong
      Viet Cong

      i preffer solder + heatshrink. but this way is better for a shop.higher margin with little effort.

      about 6 months ago
    • sri venkata srinivas
      sri venkata srinivas

      It is suitable for 16sq mm wire?

      about 6 months ago
    • Plutonius X
      Plutonius X

      Hack job. Just put some solder on it and be done with it. Even a crimped connection is better than that abomination.

      about 6 months ago