Nissan Leaf is one of the first mass produced electric cars. Since its debut in 2011 more than 320 000 Nissan Leaf cars have been sold worldwide, making this the best selling EV, and giving you an idea of global interest in electric mobility.

I live in Poland, where 500 EVs were sold in 2017, half of them Leafs, probably thanks to hefty discount as dealers had to push the outgoing model. BMW i3 is in far second place, and the rest doesn’t really count. What’s it like in your country? And how’s the charging infrastructure around where you live?

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Starting price: 32 000 euro
As tested: 40 000 euro

Also watch:
Nissan LEAF 30 kWh automobilrevue.net/v/RE1YbFYtUFYzd0k
Nissan LEAF 24 kWh automobilrevue.net/v/emp2a2xCSExRckE
KIA Soul EV automobilrevue.net/v/MzhwdVU2aF9EN28
VW e-Golf vs. BMW i3 automobilrevue.net/v/X3k0Q3JZbFpSZmc
BMW C Evolution automobilrevue.net/v/QzJSZXg5SnhYVFk
MINI Countryman PHEV automobilrevue.net/v/d3hYRlVrTzdiYTg
Hyundai IONIQ Hybrid automobilrevue.net/v/eTJUZGdqNmZmMmM

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Comments

    • Mido The Boss
      Mido The Boss

      They should make it easier by just replacing the battery(i am not sure if it is removable) but anyway, the same idea like replacing the LPG gas tank , will be quicker and more reliable

      about 1 month ago
    • Arto Kiiskinen
      Arto Kiiskinen

      Marek, I unsubbed a while back because of your stance against EVs. Checking back now to see if you have changed your mind.

      about 6 months ago
    • Arto Kiiskinen
      Arto Kiiskinen In reply to Arto Kiiskinen

      OK, does not look like it.. bye bye. I will check back again in a year or so.

      about 6 months ago
    • Mark Tiller
      Mark Tiller

      An ev, would be great for me, as I live in the middle of a city, and have a battery solar powered house.

      about 7 months ago
    • androo4519
      androo4519

      Yes. EVs are the future of motoring. Quite a common sight in the UK now (Leaf especially but i3, Renault Zoe less so and Tesla about the same) but the charging infrastructure needs to be much better. New lampposts are going to all get charging points apparently! Maybe Sweden's electric 'charging road' is the future. I would definitely buy an EV.

      about 7 months ago
    • Toronto Electric Vehicle Association TEVA
      Toronto Electric Vehicle Association TEVA

      We loved our time with the new Leaf as well ..cant wait for the 2019 liquid cooled 60kwh Plus version !

      about 7 months ago
    • NICK XP
      NICK XP

      Nissan advertises everything as an incredible thing that has never been seen before

      about 7 months ago
    • KK
      KK

      At first i was like "another video which Marek dis evs"but after all nice review. I just like to highlight that majority of ev owners charge home way or another so many of them don't need quick charge on local drives and there seem to be still some available around when they like to go on longer trips. And last +/- to ignore the rapidgate situation.

      about 7 months ago
    • Darcer's Tech
      Darcer's Tech

      As far as I know, a lot of new Greenway chargers just went online in Poland. Could make long journeys with an EV more manageable.

      about 7 months ago
    • Darcer's Tech
      Darcer's Tech In reply to Darcer's Tech

      Marek Drives That's new. Fantastic.

      Seems like the Model 3 will sell like hot cakes.

      about 7 months ago
    • Marek Drives
      Marek Drives In reply to Darcer's Tech

      I just checked. We have 4!

      about 7 months ago
    • Darcer's Tech
      Darcer's Tech In reply to Darcer's Tech

      Marek Drives True. And the prices are just as high. Definitely due to the lack of competition.

      However, we do have 2 Tesla Superchargers. 😜

      about 7 months ago
    • Marek Drives
      Marek Drives In reply to Darcer's Tech

      Greenway started in Poland only this spring, so I guess they'll expand eventually.
      Slovakia is also a much smaller country, so driving a Leaf from Bratislava to Kosice you just need one stop around Zvolen, and you're on the other side of the country.


      I don't know how is Greenway priced in Slovakia, but in Poland it costs about 18 euro to charge a Leaf full with ChaDeMo, and about twice as much using a Type 2 charger. So it's really for occasional use. It doesn't make sense, if you want to drive and EV, and save money.

      about 7 months ago
    • Darcer's Tech
      Darcer's Tech In reply to Darcer's Tech

      Marek Drives Strange. Greenway has helped the situation in Slovakia a ton and it's now possible to comfortably travel all the way from West to East of the country, especially with these newer EVs.

      about 7 months ago
    • ram64man
      ram64man

      Please test the ampera e if available in pl and the new kona ev

      about 7 months ago
    • Cheekypleb
      Cheekypleb

      I like the “whoop-whoop” noise made when the driver doesn’t intervene on propilot. Reminds me of a Boeing plane on the verge of crashing.

      about 7 months ago
    • Lauri Koponen
      Lauri Koponen

      This is the first (and only) EV what I have driven. I found Leaf very relaxing car to drive during heavy traffic because Pro pilot and E-pedal. Interior build quality is very good. I think Leafs best feature is, that it is so "normal" car to use. But it is little too expensive in Finland.

      about 7 months ago
    • Commentator541
      Commentator541

      What would truly be more efficient are small petrol cars, that don't waste as much gas for the city driving, like kei cars... but no... we all have to drive huge SUVs even though they hardly ever reach more than 50km/h in daily driving, and there is a single person in them, with a handbag and no extra luggage. Maybe a grocery bag. Inefficiency at it's prime.

      about 7 months ago
    • Gergely Juhasz
      Gergely Juhasz In reply to Commentator541

      Yeah i had the idea. These days we have excellent delivery services and most people are using their cars to commute. I'd say for that something like a Renault Twizy would be perfect. I mean in size.

      about 3 months ago
    • Marek Drives
      Marek Drives In reply to Commentator541

      I'd love an affordable (i.e. non-premium) PHEV SUV, which is not an Outlander :)
      Ford Edge would make a great PHEV IMO.

      about 7 months ago
    • Bruno Côrte
      Bruno Côrte

      No Zoe there? This is the most normal looking EV...

      about 7 months ago
    • Dennis Bloodnok Channel
      Dennis Bloodnok Channel

      Where I am in the UK, there is some charging infrastructure. But there are issues of compatibility (IE Some chargers only work with certain cables / connectors). Therefore some cars can charge in some charging points and other makes of car at other charge points. If you arrive at a charging point with the wrong connector, you have a problem.

      The UK needs a standard connector for all cars at all charging points.

      For the present moment, most EV owners that I know charge at home overnight. Often an EV is a family's second car. So an EV for local commuting and a petrol / diesel car for longer distance travel.

      Overall, at the present time, EVs are still a niche part of the car market in the UK. Having just viewed the Nissan UK website, a Nissan Leaf starts at £25190. This is roughly 30000 Euros. If you add optional extras the price quickly goes past £30000. At the present moment this is just too expensive (NB The latest Ford Focus starts at £17930).

      Given that electric motors and batteries are far less complex and far less expensive to make, EVs should be cheaper than Petrol / Diesel cars.

      about 7 months ago
    • Marek Drives
      Marek Drives In reply to Dennis Bloodnok Channel

      With the few fast charging stations we have in Poland, some are ChaDeMo, and some CSS. A new network is being built, which caters to both standards.

      about 7 months ago
    • Didier Chiron
      Didier Chiron

      Dear Marek,
      Indeed EV, plug in hybrid and petrol car will share the road. As a former owner of an A3 etron, the most important things I am checking to choose a new car is 1 the budget, 2 the kilometer range and 3 usage/practicality (is it an all day car, only for weekend only). This done if 2 cars are challenging, then 1 services offer with the car (infrastructure + cost of energy) 2 easy to use information system and connectivity with my own devices and 3 maintenance features and service offer
      I left the A3 etron because I needed to move home location and the range capacity was an issue as well as the boot capacity .
      My 2 cents ;)

      about 7 months ago
    • Bravian Shaw
      Bravian Shaw

      Hyundai Kona EV = 500km range

      about 7 months ago
    • Metamon7
      Metamon7

      In Norway I believe there are over 160000 EVs sold, and they are very cheap compared to the costs of buying and owning a diesel/gas car. The main reason is that drivers of electric cars don’t pay any taxes, and even ferries used to be free. The tax rules are supposed to be changed soon though, so there might be a lot less new EVs in the future.

      about 7 months ago
    • Oles939
      Oles939 In reply to Metamon7

      First ever reply; I've got a gen 1 Opel Ampera. Or a Chevy Volt if you will. After having a car with an electric motor I am never going back. No camshaft, no gearbox. Far less complex motor/engine bay than a conventional car. Small battery (12kwH) makes it less expensive to produce, and I can burn petrol for range extending when needed. The last 3000km I drove cost me 30L of gasoline. It is quite clear that big car companies has little interest in a technology that puts much of their expertise (making combustion motors) on the sideline.

      about 7 months ago
    • Marek Drives
      Marek Drives In reply to Metamon7

      Yes, everyone else is watching closely to see, how you guys will react :)

      about 7 months ago
    • MK KM
      MK KM

      I believe it's a very rapidly approaching future. Perhaps in a couple of years. Hyundai have already launched a 64 kWh Kona which is a comparable car, but nicer and more modern interior. I've seen a review where 90 km/h highway driving brought a 500 km range result - that's approaching the territory of petrol compact suvs in terms of range. Yes, charging infrastructure at homes is an issue, but it will soon become that owners demand it and the tide will turn. I remember way back in 2002, I had to fight in my apartment in India to allow me to install a small antenna on the roof to pick up "high speed" internet (256 kbps mind you) for 3 apartments who wanted it. Today, that same building has 100 mbps per apartment (79 apartments) with 3 different service providers.

      In the near term, I'd like to see city buses go battery electric because you know before hand how much range is needed and removing a diesel bus is equivalent to removing the pollution of some 25 or 30 cars. Start with city buses, let battery prices continue to fall, make sure people buy EV's for their 2nd "city runabout" car and watch how everything will change quicker than we all expect.

      about 7 months ago
    • Morgan Wright
      Morgan Wright

      Most people who drive EVs in the UK, where I live charge at home and hardly ever use public infrastructure. Tesla say that customers do abuse the supercharger network because used public chargers all the time isn't necessary. Which means commuting is more convenient in an EV because you never have to go to a petrol station you just plug in at home or at work.

      about 7 months ago
    • domhnall dods
      domhnall dods In reply to Morgan Wright

      I've had my leaf since the start of August and have yet to charge it at home. The Scottish Government has provided a widespread public charging network which works well. I pay for an rfid card each year and then use the public chargers. I do the same in Ireland. The situation on England is much more chaotic

      about 5 months ago
    • Marek Drives
      Marek Drives In reply to Morgan Wright

      Assuming you live in a house with a garage, where you can plug the car in. In my case I run a cable from a socket, which I normally use to plug in my lawnmower. My parking garage is on a different street, and I suspect I would blow the fuses there with an EV. A friend of mine lives in an apartment building, where he had to twist some arms, before the administration allowed him to install his private wallbox (connected to his apartment meter, because a separate meter was impossible for some reason) in the underground parking, citing multiple health&safety concerns. I know from a friend, who's in real estate, it's a similar situation in Toronto, where older condos are not EV-friendly, and not planning to be.

      about 7 months ago
    • Erdem Çizmecioğulları
      Erdem Çizmecioğulları

      In Turkey we have more than 300 ev charger. Almost 90% is 22kw capable. There has no Supercharger. 10 chademo and 43w DC. Just 100 Tesla, 150 Renault Zoe and 200 Renault Fluence ZE, 100 BMW i3 we have. That’s all. Other brands even doesn’t know ev exist on world. They are imitating dead.

      about 7 months ago
    • Thomas Pettersson
      Thomas Pettersson

      Since my name is Thomas and I support you by way of Patreon, I say: you are welcome!

      about 7 months ago
    • Marek Drives
      Marek Drives In reply to Thomas Pettersson

      Thank you. I didn't want to use your full name due to GDPR :) Alternatively I can use a nickname.

      about 7 months ago
    • Mirko Rajkovic
      Mirko Rajkovic

      0 and 0

      about 7 months ago
    • andrew7720
      andrew7720

      The future of mobility yes. The future. Not the present. Until batteries reach the energy density of fossil fuels its a tough sell. Especially in countries without any incentives. I can possibly see myself in an EV in 10-15 years. But for the foreseeable future, diesel, petrol, cng and lpg will still carry us.

      about 7 months ago
    • Martin Schwoerer
      Martin Schwoerer

      I used to drive 30k KM per year. Now it's closer to a third of that, because in Europe, we have Ryanair and high-speed trains. Never again will I drive from Frankfurt to Paris. I am just waiting for my 19-year-old car to die, and then I will pick the best EV for me. If I was a salesman or a company rep, I'd still need a Diesel or such. But as things stand, my best bet on still entering towns and cities in 2025, and not running the risk of losing all the value of an expensive ICE car, will be with an EV.

      about 7 months ago
    • phixion
      phixion

      Wow, that is one expensive car! Nice review Marek.

      about 7 months ago
    • kevin n
      kevin n

      Despite what Elon says, the battery technology isn't there yet. The verdict is still out. If the fuel cell technology achieves non precious metal level it may just be the way to go especially for trucks, buses etc Always enjoy your videos Marek!

      about 7 months ago
    • kevin n
      kevin n In reply to kevin n

      I think you have not been reading up on fuel cells lately. The precious metal content in them is dropping drastically by 80-90% in the last 5 years and they have become incredibly durable. In fact, there are several non precious metal fuel cells functioning very well since last year, albeit on a smaller scale. The drawbacks of battery tech have quickly become obvious. Battery technology equals massive weight and have the draw back of limited recharging times, operational issues in various weather conditions and very difficult fire emergencies. I'd say as battery EVs ramp up they will also quickly see a wall to economies of scale. The costs of Lithium etc will continually become more and more expensive with demand.. So in the end, I just don't see any tech solution that's ready to take over the ICE just yet.

      about 7 months ago
    • superdau
      superdau In reply to kevin n

      Battery tech is there for 95% of all cases. Fuel cells need precious metals as well, are far worse in efficiency and degrade. But yes, they might be the "range extender" that's needed for big vehicles, but currently they are far worse than anything you can build with batteries in efficiency, longevity and reliability.

      about 7 months ago
    • kevin n
      kevin n In reply to kevin n

      What in the world are you talking about? Tracks for what? There's a reason why buses and trucks are used over trains for many applications. With respect to hydrogen, they've already have ways to produce hydrogen from green sources and storage isn't a huge problem either. Many vehicles already use forms of compressed fuel and aren't major issues. Having said this, every source of energy has it's dangers. Have you seen a Tesla on fire? Battery fires are brutal and continue to burn for days. It could be argued this is the worse possible flammable energy source in this regard. Petrol fires aren't that much better... pick your poison.

      about 7 months ago
    • Commentator541
      Commentator541 In reply to kevin n

      But why even go there? They can be on tracks, just like trains, then use a small battery to do the final delivery... Hydrogen is both unstable, and requires extreme amounts of energy to produce, and the production process itself is also extremely dangerous.

      about 7 months ago
    • alliejr
      alliejr

      I think the concept of "charging network" is a false narrative and false equivalent to petrol stations. I know Tesla made a big splash in the U.S. building out a network of fast charging stations along popular travel routes, but I see this as more of a marketing effort. Even fast charging can deliver only a few miles (km) per minute of "fueling". An 8 minute petrol fill can offer hundreds of miles (km). The real use case for these cars is round-trip daily commuting and city/suburban driving. You fill up at home, drive to your destination, return and refuel (usually overnight). (Yes, yes, yes, I'm sure the EV heros have a million stories of travelling long distance and fueling on the way, but to me, these are truly edge cases). I don't know how the driving habits in Poland differ from here in the New York City area USA, but here it is extremely common to drive relatively short distances for errands, school, work, futbol practice for the kids, etc. Does that add up to no more than about 150 miles (240 km) per day? Probably most of the time the answer is, "yes".

      about 7 months ago
    • MK KM
      MK KM In reply to alliejr

      Your sarcasm is a gift! Never let it go :)

      about 7 months ago
    • Marek Drives
      Marek Drives In reply to alliejr

      You're absolutely right. Tesla is very expensive, and therefore needed to offer something extra to justify the cost. And I'm sure all Silicon Valley Tesla fanboys have war stories of picking up soya lattes in Sacramento, and returning to Palo Alto with more juice, than when they started, because their fair trade java dealer is right next to a supercharger :) 
      But in real life anything around 120 miles range is more than enough for the city. It's a matter of psychology. A car is supposed to give you (un)limited autonomy, and 150 miles seems short, when there is no fast charger at the other end.
      For my Polish version of this review I parked next to a ChaDeMo charger to film something relevant for the local market. During the 15 minutes I spent there I recharged some 20 percentage points, so half an hour would really get me enough range to stop for another bathroom break.

      about 7 months ago
    • Del Johnson
      Del Johnson

      I was hoping it was parked on a railway track for a reason.

      about 7 months ago
    • Del Johnson
      Del Johnson In reply to Del Johnson

      Some of the test roads you use are in great condition.

      about 7 months ago
    • Marek Drives
      Marek Drives In reply to Del Johnson

      It's a disused (and partially dismantled) track. Just an empty spot, where few people go.

      about 7 months ago
    • chillout1109
      chillout1109

      This was one of the simplest reviews that I have ever seen you do. Not much to say about the Nissan Leaf I see.

      about 7 months ago
    • Sawers
      Sawers In reply to chillout1109

      yeah, he didn't say anythings about rapidgate. Nissan leaf is dead, the best EV car is now Kona EV.

      about 7 months ago
    • minnie saab
      minnie saab

      👍🚗👍🚗👍🚗👍🚗👍🚗👍

      about 7 months ago