Precast / Prestressed Concrete Pavement. Field demonstrations of FHWAs system for Precast Prestressed
Concrete Pavement used by a number of State DOTs.
The video examines the feasibility of using precast pretensioned panels for roadway segments that are assembled on-site and post-tensioned.

The essential concepts for FHWAs precast prestressed concrete pavement system can summarized as follows:
•Precasting is performed utilizing the facilities already familiar to bridge engineers.
•Stockpiling of precast panels provides for rapid delivery as needed.
•Constructability and performance are facilitated by the design features of the precast panels.

Comments

    • Sid name
      Sid name

      This is good, but let's take it to the next step--for example placing an electrical grid with built in sensors for the generation of self driving vehicles that will be set in place over the next 50 + years. The same sensors could also be used for traffic law enforcement and safety measures. Often 'hardwired' is more durable than satellite technology.

      about 2 months ago
    • 786otto
      786otto

      So that's why we have those bumpy roads.

      about 9 months ago
    • The Student Official
      The Student Official

      When all commenters are civil engineering but cannot speak proper English

      about 9 months ago
    • Giangsinh Tran
      Giangsinh Tran

      RIP Kirsten Stahl

      about 1 year ago
    • shamrock4500
      shamrock4500

      not a new idea, a local roadbuilder paved 2 roads here for free to prove his idea, those roads are still in good shape 40 years later.

      about 1 year ago
    • Don Gray
      Don Gray

      Junk take it from a truck driver them concrete roads will beat you to death..the seams in between the panels sag,and they will thumpity Thump
      I swear I 10 in Louisiana and all the way across in to Texas is garbage. After Hurricane Katrina they fixed I-10 with black top in a few spots but not many, and to say concrete holds up any longer then a blacktop Highway does is a damn lie,because weather wreaks Havoc on concrete especially hardened concrete and anybody raised up in the cold knows that.. finally once concrete is cracked it is only a matter of time before it starts literally disintegrating and turning to dust, and anyone questioning that only needs to drive up any concrete road every damn one of them I'm talkin even the new ones are riddled with holes.

      about 1 year ago
    • zzubuzz
      zzubuzz

      What we need is for those sections to be retractable so when there is a protest they open than close up with a force of about 20 tons per sq. inch and they are smashed to pulp making a beautiful color of red behind.

      about 1 year ago
    • MegaJohnhammond
      MegaJohnhammond

      so how much coconut oil is actually used per square foot?

      about 1 year ago
    • Louie Jake
      Louie Jake

      Why does it need to be Prestressed?

      about 2 years ago
    • serpentineufo
      serpentineufo

      Why am i watching this?

      about 2 years ago
    • al7lem
      al7lem

      ليتهم يتعلمون عندنا

      about 2 years ago
    • Adista Store
      Adista Store

      visit us ! We sell Mill cut Steel fiber, the elite fiber against cracking.

      about 2 years ago
    • jake williams
      jake williams

      i had my driveway poured in texas ,,, that som bitch is stiff as a ministers dick

      about 2 years ago
    • john,royston Lawrence
      john,royston Lawrence

      I saw prefab roads constructed in Holland (Europe) in the sixties. All laid on sand and very quickly done.

      about 3 years ago
    • P Markey
      P Markey

      garbage, never happen.

      about 3 years ago
    • Loopy Mind
      Loopy Mind

      they talk about being able to replace sections if needed... but how does that work when multiple slabs are joined together with steel cable in all the sections and then permanently fixed... you would have to cut trough all those cables, destroying the tensioning effect... ???

      about 3 years ago
    • Mihail G
      Mihail G

      that is dome . wet a car its ok but not for trucks all douse cracks well kill the truck drivers

      about 3 years ago
    • Lane Smith
      Lane Smith In reply to Mihail G

      Mihail Gujumit

      about 2 years ago
    • merc340sr
      merc340sr

      Can concrete paving withstand -50*C weather? ..can it withstand repeated freezing and thawing?

      about 3 years ago
    • markwiss
      markwiss In reply to merc340sr

      There are still roads and some highways built in the 1930s- 1940s that are concrete. There are different grades for light, medium and heavy travel. They have lasted FAR LONGER than asphalt. The usual failure is that the substrate is not properly prepared.
      If this system works the panels can be retro fitted in the shop for heat, lighting, markings and maybe even solar collection. A WIN-WIN.

      about 1 year ago
    • MrZeddy100
      MrZeddy100

      These roads are rubbish.

      about 3 years ago
    • MakeMeThinkAgain
      MakeMeThinkAgain

      Wouldn't something like this make sense for city streets where the sections could be lifted out of the way for maintenance of utilities under the street?

      about 3 years ago
    • OK OK
      OK OK In reply to MakeMeThinkAgain

      City streest may have funny angles of turns, or sharp changes of altitude - precast panels would be hard to fit in such environment?

      about 4 months ago
    • Teo C
      Teo C

      What about storm water run off ?

      about 3 years ago
    • Oliver o niell
      Oliver o niell

      What is the wear like on tires. I know tar is a lot softer than tires.

      about 3 years ago
    • Oliver o niell
      Oliver o niell In reply to Oliver o niell

      @SAUKEN 15 whoa there pal. I was just making a suggestion. Rubber is stronger than pitch the material used to bind asphalt. asphalt is made of a thin layer of pitch covering stones. I was trying to help you ok.

      about 3 years ago
    • SAUKEN 15
      SAUKEN 15 In reply to Oliver o niell

      Once again you are wrong.. The NJ Turnpike carries at least a million cars a day and the bridges alone in Philly and into NY carry this many cars... Asphalt used on highway is NOT soft, maybe the stuff used in parking lots "may" be soft but not highways.. If that is the case please send your idiot engineers to the east coast and we will teach them about asphalt.. we get all  seasons here.. extreme heat, rainy season then snow and ice!! 

      about 3 years ago
    • nagualdesign
      nagualdesign In reply to Oliver o niell

      +SAUKEN 15  Tarmac is NOWHERE NEAR as hard as concrete!! On a hot day a stiletto heel will sink into it. The tar acts as a binder, forming a cement with the sand and aggregate, but it does not contain hydraulic (Portland) cement like concrete does, and does not set due to chemical reaction as concrete does. Essentially tarmac is a viscose suspension (of solids within a liquid), whereas concrete is a solid.

      I think you went over the top with the capitalization and exclamation marks to be honest, especially considering that no road on Earth carries a million cars per day. There should be a two-second safety gap between cars, not 11 cars per second. :-P

      about 3 years ago
    • Oliver o niell
      Oliver o niell In reply to Oliver o niell

      tar roads don't last as long as concrete. every few years they have to be resurfaced. tar works because its a thin coating on its hard filler. if it was big chunks of the stuff you could rip it apart with your hands. it wouldn't take much to skim the concrete roads with a thin layer of tar. you could nearly paint it on.

      about 3 years ago
    • SAUKEN 15
      SAUKEN 15 In reply to Oliver o niell

      You missed the part where i said.. SAND STONE AND CEMENT are all in Asphalt SAME AS CONCRETE.. The Cement activator is the TAR and when MIXED with the CEMENT< SAND AND STONE it is JUST AS HARD AS CONCRETE!! When building a road, nothing can be soft! Using your rational using (soft tar) roads would last a week after a million cars a day passed over it!

      about 3 years ago
    • AntimatePcCustom
      AntimatePcCustom

      This is not a new idear. Germany build roads like this back in the second world war in Denmark. The problem is the dirt under shift and cracks the road. making the road a bumpy ride.

      about 4 years ago
    • Duane Stearman
      Duane Stearman

      Well are brains are working.  Susan great idea, just a little out side the box of reality.  Glass thick enough to support 250,000 pounds would be very heavy.  Now with that being said, what is glass?  Transformed concrete, or sand.  so how do we raise the levels and reduce the frequency of fixing because of millions of pounds of constant pounding multiplied be the movement of temps ( expansion and contraction ) then doubled by the natural movement of the ground.  Wow, we have helter skelter on our roads.  Now back in the days of Cesar when they had made their roads, which I might say are still standing today 2000 years later.  They added volcano ash, which gets harder over time.  I think we need to look in that direction if we are looking to a permanent solution, to a problem that I believe is more like the light bulb.  I breaks so we can keep Joe in a job!!!!  With out vision for creating and moving on to something new, we will box ourselves in and life will force us on to something new.
      Remember there is always 2 ways to learn
      Revelation, information shared by past experience.
      Or
      Tribulation, paying the price of the unlearned.  Touching the paint so to say.
      Revelation is always the better way I think

      about 4 years ago
    • Jose Korvelo
      Jose Korvelo

      More half solutions from the brilliant American engineers  -- the same "experts" that gave us the bridges that fall at a mid-size earthquake and build them back wrong again, are at work here!
      The joke is on all of us that have to pay to redo this bad job again and again --- like the current pathetic new freeways that after only a few years are a mess.
      Are this guys this dumb, or are they just scamming the public, as this is good for business??

      If you are going precast (or even concrete, or any other system) it must be over beams -- yes beams, precast overlapping beams under the platforms. Laying concrete on a  bed of gravel/base (even tied together) will develop dips and bumps on the road over time, as we all can attest from the joke that are the current freeways.
       The platforms probably should be laid longitudinally, to have less joints and be one lane wide! Hills and curves can either be  precast, or cast in place --but over beams too!
      Another idea is for the surface to be machine sanded/grinded, for a desirable no joint feel.
      WHY IS THIS TOO COMPLICATED??

      about 4 years ago
    • Jose Korvelo
      Jose Korvelo In reply to Jose Korvelo

      What isn't true?
      What is your point?
      I know enough about concrete to know your numbers aren't true and that the design/engineering of  roads and bridges is a joke  --an expensive joke, that only benefits the road building industry and the politicians!!

      about 3 years ago
    • SAUKEN 15
      SAUKEN 15 In reply to Jose Korvelo

      +Jose Korvelo Simply not true.. your theory on beams under the 12" thick precast that is prestressed inside of 9,000 + PSI concrete where poured in place concrete is 5,000 PSI! Obviously you have never been around precast and If you have you don't understand it!

      about 3 years ago
    • John Collins
      John Collins

       
      additional jointed precast pavement videos please visit Rapid Roadway. com or precast pavement at Twitter.

      about 4 years ago
    • MrFrogmasterG
      MrFrogmasterG

      I love seeing all the "solar roadway" so called "engineers" spamming this! Lets all drive on wet glass! its a scam company that is funneling money into the pockets of the politicians! They must have a great PR-reps! 

      about 4 years ago
    • Johan sigurdson
      Johan sigurdson In reply to MrFrogmasterG

      I cannot imagine how slick would be in the snow not to mention the lack of sunlight they are going to get when covered in ice or snow. Also is this supposed to save money? lol I dont see how driving on solar panels is saving money just sayin.

      about 2 years ago
    • Zoomer30
      Zoomer30 In reply to MrFrogmasterG

      Yep, i just dont get how driving on plastic is going to work. Oh, and I heard a rumor that glass and plastic get really brittle in cold weather. So that basically rules out 3/4 of the country.

      about 4 years ago
    • TRICK-OR TREAT
      TRICK-OR TREAT

      DUMB B.S.  YOU HAVE TO FIRST POUR A BASE LAYER OF CONCRETE TO PUT THIS SHIT ON. YEAH THAT WILL SAVE TIME ALRIGHT. MONEY TOO. 

      about 4 years ago
    • acoow
      acoow In reply to TRICK-OR TREAT

      +TRICK-OR TREAT You must be Palestinian. They love to claim victory in defeat.

      about 3 years ago
    • TRICK-OR TREAT
      TRICK-OR TREAT In reply to TRICK-OR TREAT

      STILL FEELING THE BURN ARE WE ?

      about 3 years ago
    • acoow
      acoow In reply to TRICK-OR TREAT

      @TRICK-OR TREAT
      I apologize for assuming that you were acting stupid.  Apparently, its not an act.

      about 3 years ago
    • TRICK-OR TREAT
      TRICK-OR TREAT In reply to TRICK-OR TREAT

      +acoow TALK ABOUT LOOKING STUPID ! "BUMB B.S. ? DUH ! REALLY ?

      about 3 years ago
    • acoow
      acoow In reply to TRICK-OR TREAT

      +TRICK-OR TREAT The concrete base does not require the long cure time. Time is saved in getting the road in use. Money is saved by the roadway being built faster. Don't call something "BUMB B.S." when you have no clue what you are talking about. It makes you look stupid.

      about 3 years ago
    • Glen Bartholomew
      Glen Bartholomew

      Using Solar Roadways as our paving choice could not only improve highway construction, these precast paving blocks could produce smart thoroughfares. With energy producing paving blocks, our roads could be safer, flexible and the smart roads of the future.

      about 4 years ago
    • Robert Estes
      Robert Estes In reply to Glen Bartholomew

      @Glen Bartholomew

      about 4 years ago
    • Glen Bartholomew
      Glen Bartholomew In reply to Glen Bartholomew

       Your concerns are valid. As with any innovation, Solar Roadway paving blocks have many unknowns, just as there are still unknowns with precast concrete. Solar Roadways has done a preliminary demonstration project of their paving system and the system seems to have performed exemplary so far. There is a very thorough FAQ on their website at; http://www.solarroadways.com/faq.shtml
      But what has me excited is the flexibility and adaptability of Solar Roadway’s system. They can be applied not only to roads, but to parking lots, sidewalks and many other applications that uses pavement. I would be excited to see how precast concrete could be incorporated with solar paving. This could literally “drive” our transport systems into an integrated but flexible system, for the future.

      about 4 years ago
    • scardinals1
      scardinals1 In reply to Glen Bartholomew

      I see multiple problems with that idea of road material. First: I'm not sure how the road panels will perform as a load bearing member. They will have to go through various forms of compression and elongation due to heat and contraction due to cold temperatures. When you put the panels in line with each other, I'm not entirely sure how the system will react with these loads and stresses. Specifically on the use of solar panels as a load bearing member: A normal solar cell will not be able to withstand the amount of  varying, but constant force applied to the specific section. So there is one of two ways to combat this: Completely redesign the solar cell. Which is costly and time consuming, and may not even be able to yield to the forces. Or create a thick and strong glass or glass-like material that will be able to transfer the loads to the ground instead of directly on the solar cell. The problem with this is that the thicker the material, the more bending of light there is. This will result in a lower efficiency percentage to an already low efficiency of the solar cells (13%-15% I believe). The other factor is any material that will be over the clear material such as oil and tread marks. If light is not able to pass through the substance, that panel will be essentially useless. The other problem is cost and maintenance. The initial cost of installation will be extremely high, and I am not sure that the output will overcome the initial cost. On top of that, I guarantee that maintenance on the cells will be regular and costly as well. It's a great idea, I just don't see it being beneficial in any way with the current standings of solar cells. Let me know if you can answer or rebuke any of my concerns.

      about 4 years ago
    • John Collins
      John Collins

      to view additional jointed precast pavement videos please visit Renu Materials. com or precast pavement at Twitter.

      about 5 years ago