We are at Greensburg PA. on the ex-PRR Pittsburgh mainline. The conversion with the crew and the dispatcher reported problems with the lead locomotive. Just east of the station platform, the heavy ore train comes to a stop to have the problem looked at by a Conrail employee. After a lengthy stay, the heavy train gets moving again. The four Conrail (6755-6759-6492-6049) locomotives ease the train into motion. I Varity of nice little friction bearing ore jennies pass with PRR-PC-CR markings. By the time the rear end helpers pass, the two Conrail SD40-2's, 6359-6364 roar past in the eight notch, but still at a slow 20 mph, and trying to get up to track speed. For those familiar with the location, take note of the cars east off in the distance on the SW secondary. Video taken 9/09/1991

Thanks for watching. Jackmp294.5™

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Comments

    • David Hopson
      David Hopson

      The rear helpers sound good!!! I miss the days of loud EMD six axles. Ore coming out of Philadelphia.

      about 6 months ago
    • jackmp294.5™
      jackmp294.5™ In reply to David Hopson

      They did sound good Dave. They sure had their work cut out for them on the roller coaster Pittsburgh Division. Miss seeing those heavy trains and jenny's roll past. Thanks for watching Dave.

      about 5 months ago
    • Rose White
      Rose White

      any videos of these ol locos and their engines being machined?

      about 1 year ago
    • EdwardJSmithTitanic/ConrailFan76
      EdwardJSmithTitanic/ConrailFan76

      I estimate about 90 Ore Jennies total on that train.

      about 2 years ago
    • Steven Michael
      Steven Michael

      Until about when were there still PRR ore cars still floating around?

      about 4 years ago
    • b3j8
      b3j8

      I remember how those short ore jennies really made the needle do a dance on one of those old Servo hotbox detectors!  LOL  That was just afew yrs back...

      about 5 years ago
    • jackmp294.5™
      jackmp294.5™

      Originally from NJ, moved to PA in 1979...

      about 5 years ago
    • Roger Thornburg
      Roger Thornburg

      are u frm pa

      about 5 years ago
    • edward ansbro
      edward ansbro

      Flat spots.

      about 6 years ago
    • edward ansbro
      edward ansbro

      Those jennies all have friction wheels, they are long gone.

      about 6 years ago
    • b3j8
      b3j8

      Man, back in the day before talking detectors, and the towers had the servo detectors in them, those little ore jennies would really make the needle do a dance on the paper graph! Really amusing to watch! An era lonng gone...

      about 6 years ago
    • David Allen
      David Allen

      Nice shot nice to see this guy moving again lots of PC ore cars

      about 6 years ago
    • Willie BUTLER, JR.
      Willie BUTLER, JR.

      There was two cars of these ore jennies, still lettered for the Pennsylvania Railroad. How nice.

      about 6 years ago
    • EdwardJSmithTitanic/ConrailFan76
      EdwardJSmithTitanic/ConrailFan76 In reply to Willie BUTLER, JR.

      I counted three.

      about 2 years ago
    • sakuraknight9274
      sakuraknight9274

      That's the fuel-water separator on the locomotive's engine.

      about 6 years ago
    • Wdowa94
      Wdowa94

      What is that arc/clicking sound?

      about 6 years ago
    • Rod Williams
      Rod Williams

      To check to see if a unit is loading up you simply get in the cab and look at the AMP gauge. Standing on the ground watching usually means looking for wheel rotation which is generally done if a wheelslip light stays on whilst moving. A false wheelsip light will occur if backward transition causes power contactors to fail or when a field shunt switch gets stuck.

      about 6 years ago
    • Johns Amazing Trains - chambs123
      Johns Amazing Trains - chambs123

      OK I see, thanks for that update information buddy. Kind regards, John.

      about 6 years ago
    • CarolinaRailWorks
      CarolinaRailWorks

      John, this means that the helpers can be reversed so that the engines can be brought back down the mountain so they can push again. The engines have their cabs facing outwards so the engines can be reversed, go back down the mountain, and push another train.

      about 6 years ago
    • Johns Amazing Trains - chambs123
      Johns Amazing Trains - chambs123

      I love watching US/Canadian locos/trains. Can you please explain why on double or multiple heading & (or) rear helpers...they often run them in reverse! What is the purpose for this? Thank you.

      Cheers, John.

      about 7 years ago
    • EdwardJSmithTitanic/ConrailFan76
      EdwardJSmithTitanic/ConrailFan76 In reply to Johns Amazing Trains - chambs123

      If I'm correct, If it is behind the head power, it doesn't matter which direction they're facing. Though sometimes they're like that so the head-end crews can check on the train. Same goes for Helper units. If the Lead power is in reverse, it maybe just the way the cab controls are set up: Long Hood Forward. Other than that, IDK.

      about 2 years ago
    • jackmp294.5™
      jackmp294.5™

      @hoscalelocomotive I think one of the units wasn't loading, if I remember correctly.

      about 7 years ago
    • RagingMoon1987
      RagingMoon1987

      @sabgab Me too.

      about 7 years ago
    • Scott
      Scott

      I miss seeing Conrail Blue............

      about 7 years ago
    • UPDetector
      UPDetector

      I love seeing good old Conrails in action. Nice catch Jack

      about 7 years ago
    • bullfrog1954
      bullfrog1954

      That was interesting-I really like watching the older stuff! That's what I prefer posting myself! I've passed through Greensburg during my travels on US 30 but never checked out the station, but next time I will!

      about 7 years ago
    • cuzinitr
      cuzinitr

      Excellent! I don't know what I liked more, all that Conrail blue paint or,the sound of the locomotive's. Well done! Rich

      about 7 years ago